Legal Reform and Institution Building (in the Context of National and International Security)

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter argues that any serious national security issue will, more often than not, spill over the state border and may ignite global or regional tensions and reactions. And vice versa, a broader global or regional interest may affect a national security crisis in many ways.

The UN document “A more secure world: our shared responsibility” (2004) acknowledged that if there was to be a new security consensus, it must start with the understanding that the front-line actors in dealing with all the threats continue to be individual sovereign States. However, it can be argued that the awareness of monumental contemporary threats and their potential global impact on security and stability in the world gave rise to moving from “international” to “collective” security thinking.

The phenomenon of a weak or failing state is also analysed. Such a state commits human rights abuses, provokes humanitarian disasters, drives massive waves of immigration and attacks their neighbours. The lesson the international community and democratic governments are still to learn is that the holistic approach to reconstruction and development of a post-conflict society is the only way to guarantee stability and peace in the region.

Failed states, in spite of everything, want to be treated as equals and to feel as co-owners of the process of international police collaboration. If this prospect was clearly opened to them, they might get more serious, responsible and determined to reach certain standards that are required in “joining the club.”

Keywords

Migration Europe Income Sine Ghost 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of War StudiesKing’s College LondonLondonUK

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