Cognitive/Socioaffective Complexes and Multiple Intelligences

Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, I propose two conceptual innovations related to cognition and intelligence. Both build on the work of Demetriou and colleagues, as presented in Chap. 10. In terms of their concept of hypercognition, I expand it to include other executive and cognitive processes, as well as socioaffective ones. The new concept that I developed is termed cognitive/socioaffective complexes. They also described domains of intelligence. I expand this work into a revised concept of multiple intelligences. The intelligences relate to the stages of the present model, and the concept of domains has been included in the model.

Keywords

Coherence Posit Agglomeration Hone 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Glendon CollegeYork UniversityTorontoCanada

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