Chemoreception pp 291-296 | Cite as

Hypoxia Does Not Uniformly Facilitate the Release of Multiple Transmitters from the Carotid Body

  • Dong-kyu Kim
  • Beth A. Summers
  • Nanduri R. Prabhakar
  • Ganesh K. Kumar
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 536)

Abstract

Studies from diverse species have established that type I cell, the putative oxygen sensing element of the carotid body (CB), expresses a variety of conventional neurotransmitters like acetylcholine (ACh), dopamine (DA), and neuropeptides and unconventional neurotransmitters like NO and CO [for recent reviews see, (Prabhakar 2000; Kumar and Prabhakar 2002)]. An essential step in the initiation of the sensory response of the CB to hypoxia involves the release of one or more of neurotransmitters from type I cells onto apposed sensory nerve endings (Prabhakar 2000). From direct measurement of neurotransmitter release, it has been shown that hypoxia facilitates the release of both DA (Fidone et al. 1982; Bairam et al. 1996; Chen et al. 2000), and substance P (Kim et al. 2001) in the rabbit CB. On the other hand, hypoxia facilitates ACh release in the cat CB (Fitzgerald et al. 1999). However, it has not yet been determined by simultaneous monitoring of several transmitters whether hypoxia in a given species evokes the release of multiple or only a subset of transmitters in the CB.

Keywords

HPLC EDTA Dopamine Citrate Pyrolysis 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bairam A., Basson H., Marchai F., Cottet-Emard J. M., Pequignot J. M., Hascoet J. M. and Lahiri S. (1996) Effects of hypoxia on carotid body dopamine content and release in developing rabbits. J. Appl. Physiol. 80, 20–24.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Chen J., He L., Dinger B. and Fidone S. (2000) Stimulus-specific signaling pathways in rabbit carotid body chemoreceptors. Neuroscience 95, 283–291.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Chleide E. and Ishikawa K. (1990) Hypoxia-induced decrease of brain acetylcholine release detected by microdialysis. Neuroreport 1, 197–199.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Fidone S., Gonzalez C. and Yoshizaki K. (1982) Effects of low oxygen on the release of dopamine from the rabbit carotid body in vitro. J. Physiol. 333, 93–110.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Fidone S. J., Weintraub S. T. and Stavinoha W. B. (1976) Acetylcholine content of normal and denervated. cat carotid bodies measured by pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass fragmentometry. J. Neurochem. 26, 1047–1049.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Fitzgerald R. S., Shirahata M. and Wang H. Y. (1999) Acetylcholine release from cat carotid bodies. Brain Res. 841, 53–61.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Gibson G. E. and Peterson C. (1982) Decreases in the release of acetylcholine in vitro with low oxygen. Bio.Chem. Pharmacol. 31, 111–115.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Kim D. K., Oh E. K., Summers B. A., Prabhakar N. R. and Kumar G. K. (2001) Release of substance P by low oxygen in the rabbit carotid body: evidence for the involvement of calcium channels. Brain Res. 892, 359–369.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Kumar G. K. and Prabhakar N. R. (2002) Multiple roles of neurotransmitters in the carotid body: involvement in sensory transmission and adaptation to hypoxia, in Oxygen Sensing: Responses and Adaptation to Hypoxia (Lahiri S., Prabharkar, N.R., and Semenza, G., ed. ). Marcel Dekker, New York., in press.Google Scholar
  10. Larson R. E. and Martins H. R. (1981) Early effect of glucose and oxygen deprivation on the spontaneous acetylcholine release from the myenteric plexus of the guinea pig ileum. Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol. 59, 555–561.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Liu Y., Schweitzer E. S., Nirenberg M. J., Pickel V. M., Evans C. J. and Edwards R. H. (1994) Preferential localization of a vesicular monoamine transporter to dense core vesicles in PC12 cells. J. Cell. Biol. 127, 1419–1433.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Monti-Bloch L. and Eyzaguirre C. (1980) A comparative physiological and pharmacological study of cat and rabbit carotid body chemoreceptors. Brain Res. 193, 449–470.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Prabhakar N. R. (2000) Oxygen sensing by the carotid body chemoreceptors. J. Appl. Physiol. 88, 2287–2295.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Sanchez-Prieto J., Harvey S. A. and Clark J. B. (1987) Effects of in vitro anoxia and low pH on acetylcholine release by rat brain synaptosomes. J. Neurochem. 48, 1278–1284.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dong-kyu Kim
    • 1
  • Beth A. Summers
    • 1
  • Nanduri R. Prabhakar
    • 1
  • Ganesh K. Kumar
    • 1
  1. 1.School of MedicineCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

Personalised recommendations