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Techniques

  • Michael J. Dykstra
  • Laura E. Reuss

Abstract

Colloidal gold techniques provide cellular markers (gold particles) that are spherical and extremely electron-dense (Fig. 151). One of the chief advantages of colloidal gold techniques is that the gold particles cannot be confused with any other cellular constituents, unlike the products of previously discussed ferritin and peroxidase/DAB/osmium staining procedures.

Keywords

Gold Particle Colloidal Gold Colloidal Gold Particle Gold Chloride Gold Solution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Michael J. Dykstra 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. Dykstra
    • 1
  • Laura E. Reuss
    • 1
  1. 1.North Carolina State UniversityUSA

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