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Compensation Strategies Used by High-Ability Students with Learning Disabilities

  • Sally M. Reis
  • Lilia M. Ruban
Part of the Neuropsychology and Cognition book series (NPCO, volume 25)

Abstract

Recent research has provided fascinating examples of the problems faced by high-ability students with learning disabilities (LD), as well as the compensation strategies they used to address and overcome the challenges associated with specific learning disabilities (Reis, McGuire, & Neu, 2000; Ruban, McCoach, McGuire, & Reis, in press). For example, (2000) found that these students often received content remediation that they did not need, rather than instruction in compensatory strategies, in their elementary and secondary school learning disabilities programs. Many academically talented young people with learning disabilities never qualify for programs for gifted and talented learners and fail to succeed in school, but those who do often learn strategies that help them to succeed, despite their learning problems.

Keywords

Learning Disability Compensation Strategy Postsecondary Education Learn Disability Learn Disability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sally M. Reis
    • 1
  • Lilia M. Ruban
    • 2
  1. 1.University of ConnecticutUSA
  2. 2.University of HoustonUSA

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