Strategy

  • Richard M. Burton
  • Børge Obel
Chapter
Part of the Information and Organization Design Series book series (INOD, volume 4)

Abstract

When Bon Goût faced its problem with Samsonite, described in Chapter 6, it had a number of ways to deal with the situation. It could fight the decision made by Samsonite, or it could decide to stay in its normal business and find a new supplier to replace Samsonite. One of its major competitive strengths - its ability to deal with manufacturers and retailers - could help it find new products to import and market. Since its problems arose when the single European market was established, Bon Goût could decide to play the European game and import products from East Asia to be sold in the European market. It needed a strategy. Strategy is both means and ends; it includes the definition of the overall end goals, and the means of action needed to obtain these stated goals. Bon Goût must decide what business it wants to be in, and then it has to develop a process to realize what it wants. Environment is important for this choice. The process to obtain certain goals may require a particular organizational structure. For example, if Bon Goût decides that it wants to play the European game in the high-end fashion industry, it will need an organization that can operate in several countries. This will relate to both distribution and service to stores as well as to the ability to read fashion trends in various countries. Additionally, it needs an organizational structure that can deal with suppliers.

Keywords

Depression Europe Transportation Marketing Posit 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard M. Burton
    • 1
  • Børge Obel
    • 2
  1. 1.The Fuqua School of BusinessDuke UniversityDurham
  2. 2.Department of ManagementOdense UniversityOdenseDenmark

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