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Radiative and Conductive Heat Transfer

  • Carl J. Hansen
  • Steven D. Kawaler
  • Virginia Trimble
Part of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Library book series (AAL)

Abstract

In this chapter we discuss two ways by which heat can be transported through stars: diffusive radiative transfer by photons, and heat conduction. The third mode of transport, which is by means of convective mixing of hot and cool material, will be discussed in Chapter 5. For references on the theory and application of energy transfer in stars, we recommend the following excellent texts by (1978) and (1984). (1968), (1979), and (1998) also contain some very useful material. The discussion here will barely scratch the surface of this complex subject and will be directed toward the specific end of finding approximations suitable for the stellar interior.

Keywords

Optical Depth Radiation Pressure Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Conductive Heat Transfer True Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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4.10 References and Suggested Readings

Introductory Remarks and §4.1-§4.2: Radiative Transfer & The Diffusion Equation

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§4.5: Heat Transfer by Conduction

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§4.7: Some Observed Spectra

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§4.8: Line Profiles and the Curve of Growth

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl J. Hansen
    • 1
  • Steven D. Kawaler
    • 2
  • Virginia Trimble
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Astrophysics and Planetary SciencesUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Physics and AstronomyIowa State UniversityAmesUSA
  3. 3.Department of AstronomyUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA
  4. 4.Department of PhysicsUniversity of California, IrvineIrvineUSA

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