Mundane Materialism

Economic Survival and Theological Evolution within Jesus Movement Groups
  • David Tabb Stewart
  • James T. Richardson
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

How are religious ideology and social organization skewed by governmental “penetrations” of the “wall” separating Church and State? As New Religious Movements (so-called NRMs) enter the gladiatorial arena of our “culture wars,” what do they do? Pressed by a hostile social environment on the one hand, or by governmental economic regulation and unwanted attention on the other, they will act expediently, change their political economy, and develop or modify their theology to account for the new order (Richardson, 1982, 1998a, 1988b). To blandly state our thesis, governmental actions “deform” theology.

Keywords

Economic Crisis Income Arena Tral Sonal 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Tabb Stewart
  • James T. Richardson

There are no affiliations available

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