Advertisement

Regulating Religion

A Sociological and Historical Introduction
  • James T. Richardson
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

This volume focuses on the regulation of religion, particularly religious groups sometimes referred to pejoratively as “cults and sects” (Richardson, 1993; Dillon & Richardson, 1994), or more neutrally as New Religious Movements (NRMs). These terms, much used to refer to controversial religious groups that have recently come to the attention of scholars, the general public, and politicians, are too narrow to encompass all the religious groups discussed herein. Therefore the term minority religion will be used, although the NRM term also will be used, particularly with reference to recent regulation efforts in the United States.

Keywords

Legal System Social Control Religious Group Religious Freedom Internal Revenue Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Anthony, D. (1990). Religious movements and brain-washing litigation: Evaluating key testimony. In T. Robbins & D. Anthony (Eds.), In gods we trust (pp. 295–344). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Books.Google Scholar
  2. Anthony, D. (1999). Pseudoscience and minority religions: An evaluation of the brainwashing theories of Jean-Marie Abgrall. Social Justice Research, 12, 421–456.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Anthony, D. & Robbins, T. (1992). Law, social science, and the ‘brainwashing’ exception to the First Amendment. Behavioral Sciences and the Law,10, 5–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Anthony, D. & Robbins, T. (1998). Negligence, coercion, and the protection of religious belief. Journal of Church and State, 37, 509–527.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Barker, E. (2001). General Overview of the Cult Scene in Great Britain. Nova Religion, 4, 235–240.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Barker, E. (1995). Plus ca change. Social Compass, 42, 165–180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Beckford, J. A. (1985). Cult controversies: The societal response to new religious movements, London: Tavistock.Google Scholar
  8. Beckford, J. A. (2002). Banal discrimination: Equality of respect for beliefs and worldviews in the U.K. In D. Davis & G. Besier (Eds.), International perspectives on freedom and equality of religious belief (pp. 25–42). Waco: TX: Dawson Institute for Church-State Studies, Baylor University.Google Scholar
  9. Biermans, J. (1988). The odyssey of new religions today: A case study of the Unification Church, Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press.Google Scholar
  10. Bird, F. & Reimer, W. (1983). Participation rates in new religious movements and para-religious movements. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 21, 1–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Black, D. (1976). The behavior of law. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  12. Black, D. (1999). The social structure of right and wrong. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  13. Black, D. & Baumgartner, M. (1999). Toward a theory of the third party. In D. Black, The social structure of right and wrong (pp. 95–124). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  14. Bonn, T. & Gutman, J. (1989). The civil liberties of religious minorities. In M. Galanter (Ed.), Cults and new religious movements (pp. 257–289). Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association.Google Scholar
  15. Bromley, D. (1983). Conservatorships and deprogramming: Legal and political prospects. In D. Bromley & J. Richardson (Eds.), The brainwashing/deprogramming controversy (pp. 267–294). New York: Edwin Mellen Press.Google Scholar
  16. Bromley, D. & Robbins, T. (1993). The role of government in regulating new and nonconventional religions. In J. Wood and D. Davis (eds.), The role of government in monitoring and regulating religion in public life (pp. 205–240). Waco: J.M. Dawson Institute for Church-State Relations, Baylor University.Google Scholar
  17. Carter, L. (1990). Charisma and control in Rajneeshpuram. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Chambliss, W. (1979). On lawmaking. British Journal of Law and Society, 6, 149–171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Chambliss, W. & Zatz, M. (1993). Making law: The state, the law, and structural contradictions. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  20. Clark, E. (1996). Church-state relations in the Czech Republic: Past turmoil and present transformation. Brigham Young University Law Review, 1996, 1019–1086.Google Scholar
  21. Côté, P. & Richardson, J. (2001). Discipline litigation, vigilant litigation, and deformation: Dramatic organizational change in the Jehovah’s Witnesses. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 40, 11–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Crumper, P. (2001). The public manifestations of religion or belief: Challenges for a multi-faith society in the twenty-first century. In R. O’Dair & A. Lewis (Eds.), Law and religion (pp. 311–328). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Dasi, M. (2001). Religious freedom and NRMs in Europe, ISKCON Communications Journal, 8, 65–78.Google Scholar
  24. Davis, D. & Besier, G. (2002). International perspectives on freedom and equality of religious belief. Waco, TX: Dawson Institute of Church-State Studies, Baylor University.Google Scholar
  25. Denaux, A. (2002), The attitude of Belgium authorities toward new religious movements. Brigham Young University Law Review, 2002, 101–130.Google Scholar
  26. Deutscher Bundestag (1998). Final report of the Enquete Commission on ‘So-Called Sects and Psychogroups,’ (trans, by W. Fehlberg and M. Ulloa-Fehlberg). Bonn: Deutscher Bundestag.Google Scholar
  27. De Witt, J., Richardson, J. & Warner, L. (1997). Novel scientific evidence and controversial cases: A social-psychological examination, Law & Psychology Review, 21, 1–27.Google Scholar
  28. Dillon, J. & Richardson, J. (1994). The ‘cult’ concept: A politics of representation analysis. SYZYGY: Journal of Alternative Religion and Culture, 3, 185–197.Google Scholar
  29. Durham, C. (1999). Freedom of religion or belief: Laws affecting the structuring of religious communities. OSCE/ODIHR Background Paper 1999/4. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  30. Durham, C. (2001). The emerging legal environment faced by smaller religious communities in central and eastern Europe. Presented at CESNUR/INFORM Conference, London School of Economics, April.Google Scholar
  31. Edelman, B. & Richardson, J. (2003). Falun Gong and the law: Development of legal social control in China, Nova Religio, 6(2), 312–331.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Emory, M. & Zelenak, L. (1985). The tax exempt status of communitarian religious organizations: An unnecessary controversy? In T. Robbins, W. Shepherd, & J. McBride (Eds.), Cults, culture, and the law: Perspectives on new religious movements (pp. 177–201). Chico, CA: Scholars Press.Google Scholar
  33. Evans, C. (2001). Freedom of religion under the European Convention on Human Rights, Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Faust, D. & Ziskin, J. (1988). The expert witness in psychology and psychiatry. Science, 241, 31–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Flinn, F. (1987). Criminalizing conversion: The legislative assault on new religions. In J. Day & W. Laufer (Eds.), Crime, values, and religion (pp. 153–192). Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publising.Google Scholar
  36. Fort, J. (1985). What is ‘brainwashing’ and who says so?’ In B. Kilbourne (Ed.), Scientific Research and new religions: Divergent perspectives (pp. 57–63). San Francisco, CA: American Association for the Advancement of Science.Google Scholar
  37. Galliher, J. & Basilick, L. (1979). Utah’s liberal drug laws: Structural foundations and triggering events. Social Problems, 26, 284–297.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Galliher, J. & Cross, J. (1985). Morals legislation without morality: The case of Nevada. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.Google Scholar
  39. Gatowski, S., Dobbin, S., Richardson, J., Nowlin, C. & Ginsburg, G. (1996). The diffusion of scientific evidence: A comparative analysis of admissibility standards in Australia, Canada, England, and the United States, and their impact on social and behavioral sciences. Expert Evidence, 4, 1–8.Google Scholar
  40. Gatowski, S., Dobbin, S., Richardson, J. & Ginsburg, G. (1997). The globalization of behavioral scien-tific evidence about battered women: A theory of production and diffusion, Behavioral sciences & the law, 15, 285–305.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Gatowski, S., Dobbin, S., Richardson, J. T., Ginsburg, G., Merlino, M. & Dahir, V. (2001). Asking the gatekeepers: A national survey of judging expert evidence in a posl-Daubert world, Law and Human Behavior, 25, 433–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Geertz, A. W. & Rothstein, M. (2001). Religious minorities and new religious movements in Denmark, Nova Religio, 4, 298–309.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Ginsburg, G. & Richardson, J. (1998). ‘Brainwashing’ evidence in light of Daubert. In H. Reece (ed.), Law and science (pp. 265–288). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  44. Gregory, D. (1993). Government regulation of religion through labor and employment discrimination laws. In J. Wood & D. Davis (Eds.), The role of government in monitoring and regulating religion in public life (pp. 121–160). Waco: J. M. Dawson Institute of Church-State Studies, Baylor University.Google Scholar
  45. Gunn, J. (1996). Adjudicating rights of conscience under the European Convention on Human Rights. In J. van der Vyver & J. Witte (Eds.), Religious rights in global perspective: Legal perspectives (pp. 305–330). The Hague: M. Nijhoff.Google Scholar
  46. Gutman, J. (1985). The legislative assault on new religions. In T. Robbins, W. Shepherd, & J. McBride (Eds.), Cults, culture, and the law (pp. 101–110). Chico, CA: Scholars Press.Google Scholar
  47. Hartwell, H. (1996). The first five year span (1989–1994): Law and religion in post-communist Hungary, Brigham Young University Law Review, 1996,131–156.Google Scholar
  48. Hervieu-Leger, D. (2001), France’s obsession with the ‘sectarian threat’, Nova Religio, 4, 249–257.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Hexham, I. & Poewe, K. (1999). ‘Verfassungsfeindlich:’ Church, state, and new religions in Germany, Nova Religio, 2, 208–227.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Hume, L. (1995). Witchcraft and the law in Australia. Journal of Church and State, 37, 135–150.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Ireland, R. (1998). Religious diversity in the new Australian democracy. Australian Religious Studies Review, 12, 94–110.Google Scholar
  52. James, G. (1986). Brainwashing: The myth and the actuality. Thought: A Review of Culture and Idea, 61, 241–257.Google Scholar
  53. Introvigne, M. (1998). Blacklisting or greenlisting? A European perspective on the new cult wars. Nova Religio, 2, 16–23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Introvigne, M. (2001). Italy’s surprisingly favorable environment for religious minorities. Nova Religio, 4, 275–280.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Introvigne, M. & Melton, G. (1996), Pour en finir avec les sects. Milano, CESNUR.Google Scholar
  56. Introvigne, M. & Richardson, J. (2001). Western Europe, postmodernity, and the shadow of the French Revolution: A response to Soper and Robbins. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 40, 181–185.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Kilbourne, B. & Richardson, J. (1984). Psychotherapy and new religions in a pluralistic society. American Psychologist, 39, 237–251.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Kisala, R. & Mullins, M. (2001). Religion and Social Crisis in Japan: Understanding Japanese society through the Aum affair. New York: St. Martins Press.Google Scholar
  59. Krannenborg, R. (1994). The anticult movement in the Netherlands: An unsuccessful affair. In A. Shupe & D. Bromley (Eds.), Anti-cult move ments in cross-cultural perspectiv (pp. 221–236). New York: Garland Publishing, 221–236.Google Scholar
  60. Kurokawa, T. (1999). Mind control and new religions. SYZYGY, 8, 77–84.Google Scholar
  61. Lawson, R. (1998). ‘Seventh Day Adventists and the U.S. Courts,’ Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 40, 553–588.Google Scholar
  62. LeMoult, J. (1983). Deprogramming members of religious sects. In D. Bromley & J. Richardson (Eds.), The Brainwashing/deprogramming controversy (pp. 234–257). New York: Edwin Mellen Press.Google Scholar
  63. Lewis, J. (1999). Aum Shinrikyo and human rights. Special Issue of SYZYGY: Journal of Alternative Religion and Culture, 8. Google Scholar
  64. Lewis, J. & Melton, G. (1994). Sex, slander, and salvation: Investigating The Family/Children of God, Stanford, CA: Center for Academic Publications.Google Scholar
  65. Manwaring, D. (1962). Render unto Caesar: The flag-salute controversy, Chicago, University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  66. Mickler, M. (1994). The anti-cult movement in Japan. In A. Shupe & D. Bromley (Eds.), Anti-cult movements in cross-cultural perspective (pp. 255–274). New York, Garland Publishing.Google Scholar
  67. Miller, R. & Flowers, R. (1992). Toward benevolent neutrality: Church, state, and the Supreme Court, Waco, TX: Baylor University Press.Google Scholar
  68. Mullins, M. (2001). The legal and political fallout of the ‘Aum Affair’. In R. Kisala & M. Mullins (Eds.), Religion and social crisis in Japan (pp. 71–88). London: St. Martins Press.Google Scholar
  69. Odgers, S. & Richardson, J. (1995). Keeping bad science out of the courtroom: Changes in Australian and American expert evidence law, University of New South Wales Law Journal, 18, 108–129.Google Scholar
  70. Palmer, S. & Hardman, C. (eds.), (1999). Children in new religions, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.Google Scholar
  71. Pfeifer, J. (1999). Perceptual biases and mock juror decision-making: Minority religions in court. Social Justice Research, 12, 409–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Reader, I. (2000). Scholarship, Aum Shinrikyo, and academic integrity. Nova Religio, 3, 368–382.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Regan, R. (1986). Regulating cult activities: The limits of religious freedom. Thought: A Review of Cul ture and Ideas, 61, 185–196.Google Scholar
  74. Richardson, H. (1984). Constitutional issues in the case of Rev. Moon: Amicus briefs submitted to the United States Supreme Court. New York: Edwin Mellen Press.Google Scholar
  75. Richardson, J. (1985a). The active versus passive convert: A paradigm change in conversion/ recruitment research. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 24, 163–179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  76. Richardson, J. (1985b). The ’deformation’ of new religions: Impacts of societal and organizational factors. In T. Robbins, W. Shepherd, & J. McBride (eds.), Cults, culture, and the law (pp. 163–176). Chico, CA: Scholars Press.Google Scholar
  77. Richardson, J. (1986). Consumer protection and deviant religion: A case study. Review of Religious Research, 28, 168–179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Richardson, J. (1988a). Changing times: Religion, economics, and the law in contemporary America. Sociological Analysis, 49(s), 1–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Richardson, J. (1988b). Money and power in the new religions, Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press.Google Scholar
  80. Richardson, J. (1991). Cult/brainwashing cases and the freedom of religion. Journal of Church and State, 33, 55–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. Richardson, J. (1992a). Mental health of cult consumers: A legal and scientific controversy. In J. Schumaker (Ed.), Religion and mental health (pp. 233–244). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  82. Richardson, J. (1992b). Public opinion and the tax evasion trial of Reverend Moon, Behavioral Sciences & the Law, 10, 53–65.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. Richardson, J.( 1993a). Definitions of cult: From Socio-technical to popular-negative. Review of Religious Research, 34, 348–356.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. Richardson, J. (1993b). Religiosity as deviance: Antireligious bias in the DSM, Deviant Behavior, 14, 1–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. Richardson, J. (1993c) A social psychological critique of ‘brainwashing’ claims about recruitment to new religions. In J. Hadden & D. Bromley (Eds.), Handbook of cults and sects in America (pp. 75–97). Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.Google Scholar
  86. Richardson, J. (1994a). Dramatic changes in Ameri-can expert evidence law: From Frye to Daubert, with special attention to implications for social and behavioral sciences. The Judicial Review, 2(1), 3–36.Google Scholar
  87. Richardson, J. (1994b). Update on ‘The Family:’ Organizational change and development in a controversial new religious group. In J. Lewis & G. Melton (Eds.), Sex, sin, and slander (pp. 27–40). Stanford, CA: Center for Academic Publication.Google Scholar
  88. Richardson, J. (1995a). Clinical and personality assessment of participants in new religions. International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 5, 145–170.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  89. Richardson, J. (1995b). Legal status of minority religions in the United States. Social Compass, 42, 249–264.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  90. Richardson, J. (1995c). Manufacturing consent about Koresh. In S. Wright (Ed.), Armageddon in Waco. (pp. 153–176). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  91. Richardson, J. (1995d). Minority religions (‘cults’) and the law: Comparisons of the United States, Europe, and Australia, University of Queensland Law Journal, 18, 183–207.Google Scholar
  92. Richardson, J. (1995e). Minority religions, religious freedom, and the pan-European political and judicial institutions. Journal of Church and State, 37, 39–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  93. Richardson, J. (1996). ‘Brainwashing’ claims and minority religions outside the United States: Cultural diffusion of a questionable legal concept in the legal arena. Brigham Young University Law Review, 1996, 873–904.Google Scholar
  94. Richardson, J. (1997a). Minority religions in former Communist countries: A Sociological analysis. In I. Borowik & G. Babinski (Eds.), New religious phenomena in central and eastern Europe (pp. 257–282). Krakow: Nomos Publishing House.Google Scholar
  95. Richardson, J. (1997b). The social construction of Satanism: Understanding an international social problem. Australian Journal of Social Issues, 32, 61–82.Google Scholar
  96. Richardson, J. (1997c). Sociology and the new religions: ‘Brainwashing,’ the courts, and religious freedom. In P. Jenkins & S. Kroll-Smith (Eds.), Witnessing for sociology (pp. 115–137). New York: Praeger.Google Scholar
  97. Richardson, J. (1998a). The accidental expert. Nova Religio, 2, 31–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  98. Richardson, J. (1998b). Law and minority religions: ‘Positive’ and ‘negative’ uses of the legal system. Nova Religio, 2, 93–107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  99. Richardson, J. (1999a). The Religious Freedom Restoration Act: A short-lived experiment in religious freedom. In D. Guinn, C. Barrigar & K. Young (Eds.), Religion and law in the global village (pp. 142–164). Atlanta, GA: Scholars Press.Google Scholar
  100. Richardson, J. (1999b). Social control of new religions: From ‘brainwashing’ claims to child sex abuse accusations. In S. Palmer & C. Hardman (Eds.), Children in new religions (pp. 172–186). New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.Google Scholar
  101. Richardson, J. (2000). Discretion and discrimination in legal cases involving controversial religious groups and allegations of ritual abuse. In R. Ahdar (Ed.), Law and religion (pp. 11–132). Aldershot, U.K.: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  102. Richardson, J. (2001a). Law, social control, and minority religions. In P. Côté (Ed.), Frontier religions in public space (pp. 139–168). Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press.Google Scholar
  103. Richardson, J. (2001b). Minority religions and the context of violence: A conflict/interactionist perspective, Terrorism and Political Violence, 13, 103–133.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  104. Richardson, J. (2001c). New religions in Australia: Public menace or societal salvation? Nova Religio, 4, 258–265.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  105. Richardson, J. (2002). ‘Showtime’ in Texas: Social production of the Branch Davidian trials, Nova Religio, 5, 152–170.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  106. Richardson, J., Best, J. & Bromley, D. (1991). The Satanism scare. Hawthorne, NY: Aldine de Gruyter.Google Scholar
  107. Richardson, J. & Garay, A (2002). The European Court of Human Rights and religious freedom case. Presented at annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion, Toronto.Google Scholar
  108. Richardson, J. T., Ginsburg, G., Gatowski, S. & Dobbin, S. (1995). Problems applying Daubert to psychological syndrome evidence, Judicature, 79(1), 10–16.Google Scholar
  109. Richardson, J. & van Driel, B. (1994). New religions in Europe: A comparison of developments and reactions in England, France, Germany, and The Netherlands. In A. Shupe & D. Bromley (Eds.), Anticult movements in cross-cultural perspective (pp. 129–170). New York, Garland Publishing.Google Scholar
  110. Richardson, J. & van Driel, B. (1997). Journalists’ attitudes toward new religious movements. Review of Religious Research, 39, 116–136.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  111. Richardson, J. & Kilbourne, B. (1983). ’Classical and contemporary applications of brainwashing models: A comparison and critique. In D. Bromley & J. Richardson (Eds.), The brainwashing/deprogramming controversy (pp. 29–46). New York: Edwin Mellen Press.Google Scholar
  112. Richardson, J. & Thomas, R. (2002). Recent uses of brainwashing and mind control ideas in the legal system. Presented at CESNUR conference, Salt Lake City.Google Scholar
  113. Robbins, T. (2001). Combating ‘cults’ and ‘brainwashing’ in the United States and Western Europe: A comment on Richardson and Introvigne’s report. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 40, 169–175.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  114. Robbins, T. (1998). Objectivity, advocacy, and animosity. Nova Religio, 2, 24–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  115. Robbins, T., Anthony, D. & McCarthy, J. (1983) Legitimating repression. In D. Bromley & J. Richardson (Eds.), The brainwashing/deprogramming controversy (pp. 319–328). New York: Edwin Mellen Press.Google Scholar
  116. Saliba, J. (1993). The new religions and mental health. In J. Hadden & D. Bromley (Eds.), Handbook of cults and sects in America (pp. 99–113). Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.Google Scholar
  117. Scheppele, K. (1999). Creating a courtocracy: The case of Hungary. Presented at annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Chicago, Illinois.Google Scholar
  118. Schoen, B. (2001). New religions in Germany: The publicity of the public square. Nova Religio, 4, 266–274.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  119. Shterin, M. & Richardson, J. (1998). Local laws on religion in Russia: Precursors of Russia’s national law. Journal of Church and State, 40, 319–341.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  120. Shterin, M. & Richardson, J. (2000). Effects of the western anticult movement on development of laws concerning religion in post-communist Russia. Journal of Church and State, 42, 247–272.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  121. Shterin, M. & Richardson, J. (2002). The Yakunin v. Dworkin trial and the emerging religious pluralism in Russia. Religion in Eastern Europe, 22, 1–38.Google Scholar
  122. Shupe, A. & Bromley, D. (1980). The new vigilantes: Anticultists and the new religions, Beverly Hills,CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  123. Shupe, A. & Bromley, D. (1994). Anticult movements in cross-cultural perspective, New York: Garland Press.Google Scholar
  124. Soper, C. (2001). Tribal instinct and religious persecution: Why do west European states behave so badly? Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 40, 177–180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  125. Stark, R. (1996). The rise of Christianity, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  126. Tabory, E. (1993). Anti-democratic legislation in the service of democracy: Antiracism in Israel. In W. Chambliss & M. Zatz (Eds.), Making law (pp. 109–124). Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  127. Tabor, J. & Gallagher E. (1995). Why Waco? Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  128. Wessinger, C. (2001). How the millennium comes violently. New York: Seven Bridges Press.Google Scholar
  129. Wright, S. (1995). Armageddon in Waco. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  130. Wright, S. (2002). Justice denied: The Waco civil trial. NovaReligio, 5, 143–151.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • James T. Richardson

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations