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Warehousing

  • David Frederick Ross
Part of the Chapman & Hall Materials Management/Logistics Series book series (CHMMLS)

Abstract

The key to understanding warehousing in the twenty-first century is to perceive it as a component of several logistics functions that are integrated together to provide the supply chain with unique competitive advantage. In the past, warehousing was looked upon as a tactical function concerned with the long-term storage of raw materials and finished goods. Someone once defined a warehouse as “inventory at zero velocity.” The role of warehousing was to ensure that individual companies possessed sufficient stock not only to respond to anticipated customer requirements but also to act as a buffer guarding against the “bullwhip effect” produced by uncertainties in supply and demand characteristic of linear supply chains. As such, the operating philosophy was to search for the appropriate trade-offs between storage, purchasing, and transportation costs on the one hand, and customer serviceability targets on the other.

Keywords

Supply Chain Customer Service Material Handling Order Picking Warehouse Location 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Frederick Ross

There are no affiliations available

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