Physics and Mechanics of the Golf Swing

  • Stephen J. B. Mather
Part of the Bioengineering, Mechanics, and Materials: Principles and Applications in Sports book series (BEPS, volume 1)

Abstract

The golf swing is one of the most complex biomechanical motions and human can make in sport. Larson’s Encyclopaedia of Sports Sciences and Medicine (1970) quotes a good golf swing requires a solid stance, a firm grip, good balance, excellent timing, rotation and flexion extension of wrists and elbows, rotation of both arms in shoulder joints with the right shoulder kept mostly in adduction and the left going from adduction to full abduction, twist of the trunk and lateral thrust action through the pelvis, none of which should cause of the neck and head to shift from its central position

Keywords

Fatigue Titanium Torque Marketing Tempo 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen J. B. Mather
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamUK

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