Reduction of Phase Aberration in a Diffraction Tomography System for Breast Imaging

  • Michael P. André
  • Helmar S. Janée
  • Gregory P. Otto
  • Peter J. Martin
  • Joie P. Jones
Part of the Acoustical Imaging book series (ACIM, volume 22)

Abstract

In the past three years we have developed a diffraction tomography system for research in medical imaging.1,2 The system was designed to address some of the aspects of current medical ultrasound that limit its use in many applications. For example, high-resolution ultrasound is restricted to a small field of view which can make it difficult to locate the area of interest and which does not allow ready comparison of normal and suspected abnormal tissues. As a result, the quality of medical sonography greatly depends on the skill of the operator who must recognize the important images and capture them on film for review by physicians. The findings of sonography are therefore not easily reproduced.

Keywords

Attenuation Acoustics Summing Lorad 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    M.P. André, P.J Martin, G.P. Otto, L.K. Olson, T.K. Barrett, B.A. Spivey, D. A. Palmer, “A new consideration of diffraction computed tomography for breast imaging: Studies in phantoms and patients,” Acoustical Imaging 21, (1995), in press.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    P.J. Martin, M.P. André, B.A. Spivey, D.A. Palmer, “Sonic computed tomography for breast imaging.” In: Breast Ultrasound, B.J. Hackeloer, H. Madjar, J. Taubner, Eds. (S. Karger, Freiburg, 1994), pp 52–58.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    D. Kopans, J. Meyer, K. Lindfors, “Whole breast US imaging; four-year follow-up,” Radiology 157, 505–507 (1985).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    E. Sickles, R. Filly, P. Callen, “Breast cancer detection with sonography and mammography,” Amer J Roentgenol 140, 843–845 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    M. Kaveh, R. Mueller, R. Rylander, T. Coulter, M. Soumekh, “Experimental results in ultrasonic diffraction tomography,” Acoustical Imaging 9, 433–450 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    A. Devaney, “A filtered backpropagation algorithm for diffraction tomography,” Ultrasonic Imaging 4, 336–350 (1982).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    J.F. Greenleaf, S.A. Johnson, W.F. Samayoa, F.A. Duck, Algebraic reconstruction of spatial distributions of acoustic velocities in tissue from their time-of-flight profiles, in: “Acoustic Holography,” N. Booth, ed., Plenum, New York, (1975).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    P.L. Carson, C.R. Meyer, A.L. Scherzinger, T.V. Oughton, “Breast imaging in coronal planes with simultaneous pulse-echo and transmission ultrasound,” Science 214:1141–1143 (1981).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    M.P. André, H.S. Janée, G.P. Otto, P.J. Martin, “Diffraction tomography with large-scale toroidal arrays,”Intl J Imaging Systems & Technol 8, (1996), in press.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    E.L. Madsen, J.A. Zagzebski, G.R. Frank, “Oil-in-gelatin dispersions for use as ultrasonically tissuemimicking materials,” Ultrasound in Med & Biol 8(3):277–287 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael P. André
    • 1
    • 2
  • Helmar S. Janée
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gregory P. Otto
    • 3
  • Peter J. Martin
    • 1
    • 3
  • Joie P. Jones
    • 4
  1. 1.Radiology ServiceVeterans Affairs Medical CenterSan Diego
  2. 2.department of RadiologyUniversity of CaliforniaSan Diego
  3. 3.ThermoTrex CorporationSan DiegoCA
  4. 4.University of CaliforniaIrvine

Personalised recommendations