Advertisement

Physical Limnology

  • Thomas D. Brock
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 55)

Abstract

Although the main interest in this book is biological, the physical environment of the lake cannot be ignored. The organisms of the lake, and the ecosystem as a whole, are strongly influenced by physical processes such as vertical mixing, horizontal circulation, and sediment-water interactions. We are fortunate to have a detailed understanding of the physical limnology of Lake Mendota, deriving initially from the classical work of Birge but being elaborated to a great extent by the work of Professor Reid Bryson and his students in the 1950’s and early 1960’s, by Kenton M. Stewart in the 1960’s, and by Robert A. Stauffer in the 1970’s. In addition to these kinds of physical studies, many biologically- or chemically-oriented workers have carried out routine physical measurements as part of their special research studies.

Keywords

Lake Level Eutrophic Lake Water Budget Heat Budget Lake Volume 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Birge, E.A. 1915. The heat budgets of American and European lakes. Transactions Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Letters, 18: 166–213.Google Scholar
  2. Birge, E.A. and C. Juday. 1911. The inland lakes of Wisconsin. The dissolved gases of the water and their biological significance. Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey Bulletin 22, Scientific Series No. 7, 259 pp. Madison, Wisconsin.Google Scholar
  3. Brock, T.D., D.R. Lee, D. Janes, and D. Winek. 1982. Groundwater seepage as a nutrient source to a drainage lake; Lake Mendota, Wisconsin. Water Research, 16: 1255–1263.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bryson, R.A. and W.W. Bunge. 1956. The “stress-drop jet” in Lake Mendota. Limnology and Oceanography, 1: 42–46.Google Scholar
  5. Bryson, R.A. and R.A. Ragotzkie. 1955. Rate of water replacement in a bay of Lake Mendota, Wisconsin. American Journal of Science, 253: 533–539.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bryson, R.A. and V.E. Suomi. 1952. The circulation of Lake Mendota. Transactions of American Geophysical Union, 1: 42–46.Google Scholar
  7. Clarke, D.B. and R.A. Bryson. 1959. An investigation of the circulation over Second Point Bar, Lake Mendota. Limnology and Oceanography, 4: 140–144.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Cline, Denzel R. 1965. Geology and ground-water resources of Dane County, Wisconsin. U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1779-U, 64 pp. plus maps. U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C.Google Scholar
  9. Hutchinson, G.E. 1957. A Treatise on Limnology, Vol. 1. John Wiley & Sons, New York.Google Scholar
  10. Juday, Chancey. 1914. The Inland Lakes of Wisconsin. The Hydrography and Morphometry of the Lakes. Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey Bulletin 27, Scientific Series No. 9, Madison, Wisconsin.Google Scholar
  11. Kanneberg, Adolph. 1936. The Dam at the Outlet of Lake Mendota. pp. 17–19 In: Lake Mendota Origin and History, The Technical Club of Madison, Madison, Wisconsin.Google Scholar
  12. Lathbury, A., R. Bryson and B. Lettau. 1960. Some observations of currents in the hypolimnion of Lake Mendota. Limnology and Oceanography, 5: 409–413.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Lathrop, R.C. 1979. Dane County Water Quality Plan Appendix B: Water Quality Conditions; Appendix H: Lake Management. Dane County Regional Planning Commission, Madison, WI.Google Scholar
  14. Lee, D.R. 1977. A device for measuring seepage flux in lakes and esturaries. Limnology and Oceanography, 22: 140–147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. McCaskey, A.E. 1955. Hydrological Characteristics of Lake Mendota Drainage Basin. Ph.D. Thesis University of Wisconsin, Madison.Google Scholar
  16. Mitchell, V.L. 1979. Drought in Wisconsin. Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, 67: 130–134.Google Scholar
  17. Mortimer, C.H. 1956. p. 178 In: E. A. Birge, A Memoir, by G. C. Sellery. University of Wisconsin Press, Madison.Google Scholar
  18. Murray, R.C. 1956. Recent sediments of three Wisconsin lakes. Bulletin of Geological Society of America, 67: 883–910.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Neess, J.C., and W.W. Bunge. 1956. An unpublished manuscript of E.A. Birge on the temperature of Lake Mendota; Part 1. Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, 45: 193–208.Google Scholar
  20. Neese, J.C., and W.W. Bunge. 1957. An unpublished manuscript of E.A. Birge on the temperature of Lake Mendota; Part 2. Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, 46: 31–89.Google Scholar
  21. Ragotzkie, R.A. 1978. Heat budgets of lakes. pp. 1–19 In Lakes Chemistry Geology Physics (A. Lerman, editor), Springer-Verlag, New York.Google Scholar
  22. Ragotzkie, R.A. and R.A. Bryson. 1953. Correlation of currents with the distribution of adult Daphnia in Lake Mendota. Journal of Marine Research, 12: 157–172.Google Scholar
  23. Shulman, M.D. and R.A. Bryson. 1961. The vertical variations of wind-driven currents in Lake Mendota. Limnology and Oceanography, 6: 347–355.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Sonzogni, W.C., and G.F. Lee. 1974. Nutrient sources for Lake Mendota. 1972. Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, 62: 133–164.Google Scholar
  25. Stauffer, R.E. 1974. Thermocline Migration-Algal Bloom Relationships in Stratified Lakes. Ph.D. Thesis University of Wisconsin, Madison.Google Scholar
  26. Stauffer, R.E. 1980. Windpower time series above a temperate lake. Limnology and Oceangraphy, 15: 513–528.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Stauffer, R.E. 1985. Lateral solute concentration gradients in stratified eutrophic lakes. Water Resources Research.Google Scholar
  28. Stewart, K.M. 1965. Physical limnology of some Madison Lakes. Ph.D. Thesis University of Wisconsin, Madison.Google Scholar
  29. Stewart, K.M. 1973. Detailed time variations in mean temperature and heat content of some Madison lakes. Limnology and Oceanography, 218–226.Google Scholar
  30. Stewart, K.M. and A.D. Hasler. 1972. Limnology of some Madison lakes: annual cycles. Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, 40: 87–123.Google Scholar
  31. Thornthwaite, C.W., J.R. Mather and D.B. Carter. 1958. Water balance maps of eastern North America. Resources for the Future, Washington, D.C.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas D. Brock
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BacteriologyUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA

Personalised recommendations