Very-High Frequency Ultrasonic Imaging and Spectral Assays of the Eye

  • Frederic L. Lizzi
  • andrew Kalisz
  • Michael Astor
  • D. Jackson Coleman
  • Ronald H. Silverman
  • Dan Z. Reinstein
Part of the Acoustical Imaging book series (ACIM, volume 23)

Abstract

During the past several years, focused ultrasonic transducers operating at center frequencies near 50 MHz have become available for pulse-echo imaging.1 The large bandwidths (e.g., 30 MHz) and narrow beamwidths (e.g., 75 urn) afforded by these transducers have greatly increased the resolution attainable for examining superficial segments of the body.

Keywords

Attenuation Fluoride Retina Autocorrelation Glaucoma 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederic L. Lizzi
    • 1
  • andrew Kalisz
    • 1
  • Michael Astor
    • 1
  • D. Jackson Coleman
    • 2
  • Ronald H. Silverman
    • 2
  • Dan Z. Reinstein
    • 2
  1. 1.Riverside Research InstituteNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Cornell University Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA

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