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Interpersonal and Systemic Theories of Personality

  • Steven N. Gold
  • Gonzalo Bacigalupe
Part of the The Plenum Series in Social/Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

The spectrum of theories of personality represents a range of accounts and explanations of the phenomena constituting personality development, processes, and functioning. Even more fundamentally, however, each personality theory differs in its conception of what personality is. Certain theoretical viewpoints even question or dispute whether personality, in the sense of a force that controls and directs intentions and actions, exists. Perhaps the best known instance of such a perspective is that of B. F. Skinner (1957), B. F. Skinner (1971)) who argued that behavior is controlled not by the person or personality, but by the environmental consequences of the person’s behavior.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven N. Gold
    • 1
  • Gonzalo Bacigalupe
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Psychological StudiesNova Southeastern UniversityFort LauderdaleUSA
  2. 2.Graduate College of EducationUniversity of Massachusetts-BostonBostonUSA

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