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Psychoanalytic Theories of Personality

  • Bady Quintar
  • Robert C. Lane
  • W. Bradley Goeltz
Part of the The Plenum Series in Social/Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

Prior to the emergence of psychoanalysis as a promising science, the zeitgeist was dominated by materialist biology and the natural sciences. Toward the middle of the 19th century, the scientific circles were challenging the basic assumptions of the naturalistic and speculative philosophy that dominated the intellectual community. The 19th-century concept of energy, the new discoveries in neurology, and the Darwinian theory of evolution were highly influential in the development of psychoanalysis as a new science. Holtzman (1995) states,

The Darwinian influence can be seen in Freud’s ideas of the development of infantile forms of sexuality into mature adult sexuality or of their failure to develop, as exemplified by disordered or “perverse” behavior. The epigenetics of sexuality, the idea that sexuality in its mature genital for does not appear suddenly de novo but emerges from an orderly developmental sequence beginning in infancy, was perhaps as revolutionary as Darwin’s idea of the phylogenetic descent of man and the origin of species. Indeed, this revolutionary view of sexuality was directly derived from Darwinian thought. (p. 16)

Keywords

Original Work Object Relation Psychoanalytic Theory Transitional Object Object Relation Theorist 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bady Quintar
    • 1
  • Robert C. Lane
    • 1
  • W. Bradley Goeltz
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Psychological StudiesNova Southeastern University, Fort LauderdaleFloridaUSA

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