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Subjective Well-Being and Personality

  • Ed Diener
Part of the The Plenum Series in Social/Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

La Rochefoucauld argued that personality is an important cause of happiness and of unhappiness. Modern researchers find, however, that he was incorrect in underestimating the size of this influence. It appears that happiness, the experience of unpleasant emotions, and life satisfaction often depend more on temperament than on one's life circumstances. Indeed, it is now reasonable to hypothesize that personality is a major determinant of longterm, subjective well-being.Walter Mischel (1968) argued in a well known book, Personality and Assessment, that dispositions are weak determinants of behavior, and that situations are much stronger predictors of overt responses. In the realm of subjective wellbeing, Mischel's argument is turned on its head—it appears that situations are weak predictors, and personality is a strong correlate, of long-term subjective well-being.

Keywords

Life Satisfaction Positive Affect Unpleasant Emotion Journal ofPersonality Life Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ed Diener
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of IllinoisChampaignUSA

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