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Chronic Pelvic Pain in Women

  • Michael S. Kavic

Abstract

Chronic pelvic pain is a common gynecological problem, accounting for 10 to 30% of all gynecological visits. Approximately 78,000 hysterectomies are performed each year for chronic pelvic pain. Chronic pelvic pain may, however, have its origins not only in the structures of the reproductive system but also in the urological, musculoskeletal neurological, myofascial, or gastrointestinal systems. In a series of 500 patients with chronic pelvic pain, 70% were found to have reproductive organ disease; 10% had gastrointestinal tract disorders, 8% had musculoskeletal neurological disease, 7% had myofascial abnormalities, and 5% had urological causes. Chronic pelvic pain can have many etiologies, and a multidisciplinary approach is frequently necessary.

Keywords

Chronic Pelvic Pain Femoral Hernia Piriformis Muscle Obturator Hernia Perineal Hernia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael S. Kavic
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Education and General SurgerySt. Elizabeth Health CenterYoungstownUSA

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