Fundamental Behavioral Methods and Findings in Classical Conditioning

  • E. James Kehoe
  • Michaela Macrae

Abstract

This chapter is intended to provide a solid foundation in the methods and findings of classical conditioning at a behavioral level. We take readers from an introduction to the basics of classical conditioning through to its more complex and recent findings that appear related to higher-order processes that are commonly labeled as attention, perception, and even cognition. Many textbook descriptions of classical conditioning give the mistaken impression that it is an area of completed science. In fact, the methods of classical conditioning have continued to evolve, and the range of important phenomena has continued to expand. Although this chapter primarily describes the empirical methods and outcomes of classical conditioning, we introduce important theoretical principles along the way. These principles have proven crucial in organizing research findings and in linking classical conditioning to other learning phenomena. In addition, our introduction to behavioral theory should help the reader place the phenomena described in this chapter in the context of the theories described in more detail in the next chapter (Brandon, Vogel, & Wagner, this volume).

Keywords

Fatigue Hull NMDA Dition Dura 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. James Kehoe
    • 1
  • Michaela Macrae
  1. 1.School of PsychologyUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia

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