Sexual Disorders

  • William O’Donohue
  • Tamara Penix
  • Lisa Regev

Abstract

Sexual functioning is important for many reasons. Biologically, of course, it is critical for the propagation of the species. And speaking less biologically, it can be the source of one of life’s greatest treasures—children. It can be a source of great physical pleasure. It can also result in becoming close to another person in a very special way. One can experience and give comfort, closeness, and intimacy in sexual contact. Finally, sexual functioning can be an important component of a positive self-image—most of us like to think of ourselves as sexually desirable and sexually skilled. Thus, when sexual functioning becomes a problem, these benefits may also be jeopardized. Partners may leave, self-esteem may plummet, and one can feel lonely and estranged from others.

Keywords

Depression Transportation Dementia Testosterone Androgenic Hormone 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abrams, S. (1991). The use of polygraphy with sex offenders. Annals of Sex Research, 4, 239–263.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. American Psychiatric Association. (1952). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 1st ed. Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  3. American Psychiatric Association. (1968). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 2nd ed. Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  4. American Psychiatric Association. (1980). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 3rd ed. Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  5. American Psychiatric Association. (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th ed. Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  6. Anderson, B. L. (1981). A comparison of systematic desensitization and directed masturbation in the treatment of primary orgasmic dysfunction in females. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 49, 568–570.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Auerbach, R., & Kilmann, P. R. (1977). The effects of group systematic desensitization on secondary erectile failure. Behavior Therapy, 8, 330–339.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Avina, C, & O’Donohue, W. (1999). The measurement of sexual behavior. Manuscript in preparation.Google Scholar
  9. Barlow, D. H. (1986). Causes of sexual dysfunction: The role of anxiety and cognitive interference. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 54, 140–148.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Bradford, J. (1998). Medical interventions in sexual deviance. In D. R. Laws & W. O’Donohue (Eds.), Sexual deviance: Theory, assessment, and treatment. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  11. Bradford, J., Boulet, J., & Pawlak, A. (1992). The paraphilias: A multiplicity of deviant behaviours. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 37, 104–108.Google Scholar
  12. Conte, H. R. (1986). Multivariate assessment of sexual dysfunction. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 5, 149–157.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Davis, C, Yarber, W, Bauserman, R., Schreer, G., & Davis, S. (Eds.). (1998). Handbook of sexuality-related measures. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  14. Eichel, E. W, Eichel, J. D., & Kule, S. (1988). The technique of coital alignment and its relation to female orgasmic response and simultaneous orgasm. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 14, 129–141.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Finkelhor, D. (1984). Child sexual abuse: New theory and research. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  16. Freund, K., Seto, M., & Kuban, M. (1998). Frotteurism and the theory of courtship disorder. In D. R. Laws & W. O’Donohue (Eds.), Sexual deviance: Theory, assessment, and treatment. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  17. Freund, K., & Watson, R. (1990). Mapping the boundaries of courtship disorder. Journal of Sex Research, 27, 589–606.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Goldman, A., & Carroll, J. L. (1990). Educational intervention as an adjunct to treatment of erectile dysfunction in older couples. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 19, 127–141.Google Scholar
  19. Heiman, J., LoPiccolo, L., & LoPiccolo, J. (1976). Becoming orgasmic: A sexual growth program for women. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  20. Hucker, S., & Bain, J. (1990). Androgenic hormones and sexual assault. In W. L. Marshall, D. R. Laws, & H. E. Barbaree (Eds.), Handbook of sexual assault: Issues, theories, and treatment of the offender (pp. 93–102). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
  21. Hunter, J., & Mathews, R. (1998). Sexual deviance in females. In D. R. Laws & W. O’Donohue (Eds.), Sexual deviance: Theory, assessment, and treatment. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  22. Huribert, D. F. (1993). A comparative study using orgasm consistency training in the treatment of women reporting hypoactive sexual desire. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 19, 41–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Kaplan, H. S. (1977). Hypoactive sexual desire. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 3, 3–9.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Kohlenberg, R. J. (1974). Directed masturbation and the treatment of primary orgasmic dysfunction. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 3, 349–356.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Laumann, E. O., Paik, A., & Rosen, R. C. (1999). Sexual dysfunction in the United States: Prevalence and predictors. Journal of the American Medical Association, 281, 537–544.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Lowe, J. C, & Mikulas, W. L. (1975). Use of written material in learning self-control of premature ejaculation. Psychological Reports, 37, 295–298.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Maletzky, B. (1991). The use of medroxyprogesterone acetate to assist in the treatment of sexual offenders. Annals of Sex Research, 4, 117–129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Maletzky, B. (1993). Factors associated with success and failure in the behavioral and cognitive treatment of sexual offenders. Annals of Sex Research, 6, 241–258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Maletzky, B. (1998). The paraphilias: Research and treatment. In P. Nathan & J. Gorman (Eds.), A guide to treatments that work. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Masters, W. H., & Johnson, V. E. (1966). Human sexual response. Boston: Little/Brown.Google Scholar
  31. Masters, W. H., & Johnson, V. E. (1970). Human sexual inadequacy. Boston: Little/Brown.Google Scholar
  32. Munjack, D. J., Schlaks, A., Sanchez, V. C, Usigli, R., Zulueta, A., & Leonard, M. (1984). Rational-emotive therapy in the treatment of erectile failure: An initial study. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 10, 170–175.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. O’Donohue, W. T., Dopke, C, & Swingen, D. (1997). Psychotherapy for female sexual dysfunction: A review. Clinical Psychology Review, 17, 537–566.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. O’Donohue, W. T., & Plaud, J. (1991). The long-term habituation of sexual arousal in the human male. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 22, 87–96.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. O’Donohue, W. T., Swingen, D., Dopke, C, & Regev, L. (1999). Psychotherapy for male sexual dysfunction: A review. Clinical Psychology Review, 19, 519–530.Google Scholar
  36. Schover, L. R., & Jensen, S. B. (1988). Sexuality and chronic illness: A comprehensive approach. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  37. Spanier, G. B. (1976). Measuring dyadic adjustment: New scales for assessing the quality of marriage and similar dyads. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 38, 15–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Wincze, J. P. (1971). A comparison of systematic desensitization and“vicarious extinction” in a case of frigidity. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 2, 285–289.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Wolpe, J. (1958). Psychotherapy by reciprocal inhibition. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • William O’Donohue
    • 1
  • Tamara Penix
    • 1
  • Lisa Regev
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Nevada RenoRenoUSA

Personalised recommendations