Eating Disorders

  • Linda Krug Porzelius
  • Britta D. Dinsmore
  • Darlene Staffelbach

Abstract

The majority of women in Western industrialized countries experience some symptoms of eating disorder, including body dissatisfaction, excessive weight concerns, chronic dieting, and extreme weight control practices. Almost all women report some dissatisfaction with their bodies and appearance, and more than half report significant dissatisfaction (Cash & Henry, 1995). The term “normative discontent” highlights just how widespread weight concerns are among girls and women in our society (Striegel-Moore, Silberstein, & Rodin, 1986).

Keywords

Fatigue Obesity Depression Mold Dehydration 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda Krug Porzelius
    • 1
  • Britta D. Dinsmore
    • 2
  • Darlene Staffelbach
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Professional PsychologyPacific UniversityForest GroveUSA
  2. 2.Pacific University Student Counseling CenterForest GroveUSA
  3. 3.St. Vincent’s Hospital Eating Disorder ProgramProvidence St. Vincent HospitalPortlandUSA

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