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DPE Networks and Evolutionary Dynamics

  • David  G. GreenEmail author
  • Jing Liu
  • Hussein A. Abbass
Chapter

Abstract

Classic evolutionary algorithms (EAs) use a single population (panmixia) of individuals and apply operators on them as a whole. To prevent EAs from concentrating on a small search space area, structured EAs have been proposed to as a means for improving the search properties, which started from the parallel implementation of EAs [1, 2, 3, 4]. This kind of EAs uses spatially structured populations in which any given individual has its own neighborhood. Usually, the size of the neighborhood is much smaller than the size of the population. In this way, instead of all the other individuals in the population being considered as potential mates as in panmictic populations, only those that are in the same neighborhood can interact.

Keywords

Selection Pressure Selection Scheme Random Network Neighborhood Size Pair Approximation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • David  G. Green
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jing Liu
    • 2
  • Hussein A. Abbass
    • 3
  1. 1.Faculty of Information TechnologyMonashClaytonAustralia
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Intelligent Perception and Image Understanding of Ministry of EducationXidian UniversityXi’anPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.School of Engineering and Information TechnologyUniversity of New South WalesCanberraAustralia

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