The Status of Archaeology and Anthropology in Southern Africa Today: Namibia as Example

Chapter

Abstract

The short history of the esoteric disciplines of archaeology and anthropology in the countries of southern Africa is highlighted. Political conditions, education, and problems connected with language and communication relate to poor administration and lack of sound information about these interdisciplinary fields. The role of individuals and of institutions such as museums and international organizations is considered in relation to the great potential which archaeology could hold for future development.

Keywords

Migration Europe Excavation Palaeontology Congo 

Notes

Acknowledgments

I gratefully acknowledge the help of many people: Megan Biesele and Hildi Hendrickson for assisting with structure and content of this paper; Shirley Pager, Cornelia Limpricht, Eileen Kose and Klaus Becker for commenting on the draft; Gunter von Schuman for information on underwater archaeology and Wilfrid Haacke for information about linguistics. Last but not least I thank Wend Ewest for listening and unconditional praise.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The University Centre for Studies in Namibia (TUCSIN)WindhoekNamibia

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