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Introduction

Chapter

Abstract

What will the role of regional archaeologies be in the twenty-first century globalized context of information exchange? Will they continue as data-providers or domains for testing ideas developed elsewhere, or should we view regional archaeologies as significant contributors to the world’s cultural heritage? These questions outline the guiding principle behind the presented book in which its contributors offer sociological and historical overviews of archaeology in non-English-speaking countries worldwide. There are significant regional differences in theorizing about the past and in practising archaeology and the aim of this book is to identify and explain those differences, as well as point out the existing similarities. Different goals have been assigned to archaeology in order to fulfil local expectations. These goals are entrenched in local politics and/or social expectations behind the research on cultural heritage. In some cases, archaeology was propagated through economic or political interdependence and contributed to a phenomenon identified here as intellectual colonialism. The chief goal of this book is to compare and contrast the presently existing various models of archaeology and see how regional archaeo­logies contribute to the currently globalized interest in the past.

Keywords

Cultural Heritage Archaeological Research Culture Resource Management Public Archaeology Archaeological Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Before launching this project I consulted colleagues around the world and would like to thank them as well as anonymous reviewers for their opinions and suggestions, especially Alexander Gramsch, Junko Habu, Yannis Hamiliakis, Hildi Hendrickson, Cornelius Holtorf, Marjeta Sasel Kos, Martin Kuna, Michael Meyer, Sarah Nelson, Evzen Neustupny, Romuald Schild, and Ulrike Sommer. Special thanks to Willem Willems for agreeing to write a preface for this book.

Maria Roper from the Horizon Translation Service translated Mario Sanoja and Iraida Vargas’ paper from Spanish. Thames and Hudson kindly gave permission to reprint Kristian Kristiansen’s chapter “A Social History of Danish Archaeology.”

Teresa Krauss and Katie Chabalko, editors at Springer, guided the manuscript to its completion and publication. Special thanks are due to Project Manager Tessy Priya, Brian Halm and the production team for their efforts to prepare the book in a timely manner.

I thank Dan Bates and Judith Tucker for their help in capacities too many to mention, but especially for a perfect accommodation to complete the book.

I dedicate this book to my wife Magda Lozny, my companion for the last sturdy 30 years. The Catskills, New York, August 2010

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyHunter College, CUNYNew YorkUSA

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