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The Redundancy Effect

Part of the Explorations in the Learning Sciences, Instructional Systems and Performance Technologies book series (LSIS,volume 1)

Abstract

The redundancy effect may appear on the surface to be related to the split-attention effect but in fact is quite unrelated. There are similarities because both effects deal with multiple sources of information such as visuals and text. As is the case for the split-attention effect, any combination of diagrams, pictures, animations and ­spoken or written verbal information can lead to the generation of extraneous ­cognitive load. Nevertheless, despite their surface similarities, the redundancy effect has very different characteristics to the split-attention effect. The two effects differ because the logical relations between the multiple sources of information required as essential pre-requisites to produce each effect differ; that difference is critical and should never be ignored.

Keywords

  • Cognitive Load
  • Work Memory Load
  • Element Interactivity
  • Cognitive Load Theory
  • Work Memory Resource

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to John Sweller .

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Sweller, J., Ayres, P., Kalyuga, S. (2011). The Redundancy Effect. In: Cognitive Load Theory. Explorations in the Learning Sciences, Instructional Systems and Performance Technologies, vol 1. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-8126-4_11

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