Informed Consent

Chapter

Abstract

Informed consent is a concept that tends to be overlooked by many healthcare practitioners. It often is treated as but a step when it should be viewed as an important preface to the procedure and subsequent relationship with the surgical patient. Currently, patients have “the right to consent to or refuse healthcare and that they (must) be provided with all information material to a decision to consent to or to refuse healthcare.”

Keywords

Tame 

Selected Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of General SurgeryStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryStanford School of MedicineStanfordUSA

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