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Promoting Resilience: Suggestions for Families, Professionals, and Students

  • John LucknerEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The majority of children who are deaf mature and become healthy adults who have fulfilling relationships and meaningful careers and they contribute to society. Unfortunately, the professional literature in the field of deaf education tends to be oriented toward deficiencies and problems. This chapter stresses a strength-based perspective and begins by presenting the results of three small-scale studies that examined the perceptions of successful students, adults, and families. Central themes from those studies are presented and then interwoven with a summary of practical suggestions for promoting resilience.

Keywords

Hearing Loss American Sign Language Successful Student Healthy Family Individualize Education Plan 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer New York 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Special Education, Bresnahan/Halstead CenterUniversity of Northern ColoradoGreeleyUSA

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