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Effects of Assuming Constant Optical Scattering on Haemoglobin Concentration Measurements Using NIRS during a Valsalva Manoeuvre

  • Lei GaoEmail author
  • Clare E. ElwellElwell
  • Matthias Kohl-Bareis
  • Marcus Gramer
  • Chris E. Cooper
  • Terence S. Leung
  • Ilias Tachtsidis
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 701)

Abstract

Resolving for changes in concentration of tissue chromophores in the human adult brain with near-infrared spectroscopy has generally been based on the assumption that optical scattering and pathlength remain constant. We have used a novel hybrid optical spectrometer that combines multi-distance frequency and broadband systems to investigate the changes in scattering and pathlength during a Valsalva manoeuvre in 8 adult volunteers. Results show a significant increase in the reduced scattering coefficient of 17% at 790nm and 850nm in 4 volunteers during the peak of the Valsalva. However, these scattering changes do not appear to significantly affect the differential pathlength factor and the tissue haemoglobin concentration measurements.

Keywords

Valsalva Manoeuvre Newborn Piglet Human Adult Brain Optical Scattering Water Percentage Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lei Gao
    • 1
    Email author
  • Clare E. ElwellElwell
    • 1
  • Matthias Kohl-Bareis
    • 2
  • Marcus Gramer
    • 2
  • Chris E. Cooper
    • 3
  • Terence S. Leung
    • 1
  • Ilias Tachtsidis
    • 1
  1. 1.Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory, Department ofMedical Physics and BioengineeringUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.University of Applied Sciences KoblenzRemagenGermany
  3. 3.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of EssexColchester EssexUK

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