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Neuropsychological Concerns

  • William Drew Gouvier
  • Heather A. Stewart
  • Adrianne M. Brennan
Chapter

Abstract

Owing to advances in injury prevention, acute emergency care, and rehabilitation technology, individuals who have sustained neurological insult, such as traumatic brain injury (TBI), enjoy a much improved prognosis. Each year, approximately 1.4 million Americans sustain TBIs, 230,000 of whom survive (Thurman & Guerrero, 1999). Additionally, at any given time there are 5.3 million Americans living with TBI-related disability (Langlois, Rutland-Brown, & Thomas, 2004). Costs associated with TBI are among the highest of all injuries and account for $48.3 billion annually (Brain Injury Association, 1999). The gravity of these statistics is underscored by the prediction that by the year 2020, TBI will be the third leading cause of death and disability (Murray & Lopez, 1997). Due to the prevalence of neurological insult and the monetary expenses related to TBI, civil cases related to TBI are becoming increasingly more common within the forensic arena.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Neuropsychological Assessment Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Cognitive Rehabilitation Neuropsychological Battery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Drew Gouvier
    • 1
  • Heather A. Stewart
  • Adrianne M. Brennan
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA

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