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Clinical Detection of Malingering

  • Lawrence C. Hartlage
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

There is no question that malingered data must be recognized and dealt with if neuropsychological data are to be accepted as representing valid indices of diagnostic, etiological, and prognostic phenomena. As neuropsychologists are increasingly drawn into the forensic arena, the veridicality and reliability of data generated by neuropsychological examination have increasingly been brought under scrutiny and into question (Satz, 1988). Interestingly, there have been suspicions for many years of secondary gain or malingering motivation following injuries of all types, described in law and psychiatric literature under such names as “accident aftermath, litigation or profit neurosis; compensation hysteria; post-accident syndrome; or unconscious malingering” (Mendelson, 1987), so that at least a modicum of skepticism in evaluating postinjury sequelae under litigation is not only prudent but requisite for accurate interpretation of findings.

Keywords

Head Injury Neuropsychological Test Battery Clinical Detection Neuropsychological Examination Mild Head Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence C. Hartlage
    • 1
  1. 1.Augusta Neuropsychology CenterAugustaUSA

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