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Beyond Rationality: Information Design for Supporting Emergent Groups in Emergency Response

  • Tung X. BuiEmail author
  • Ina Sebastian
Chapter
Part of the Annals of Information Systems book series (AOIS, volume 13)

Abstract

Acknowledging that real-time information is central to emergency response, we advocate that information provided to decision makers – especially the emergent groups who happen to be at the crisis scene and are called upon to help under extraordinary conditions – should not just be designed to support ­problem-solving in a rational behaviour. Based on a framework of cognitive, affective and situational information support, we call for inclusion of information that helps deal with emotion and stress, reinforces motivation to help, and nurtures a sense of altruism. To illustrate our discussion, we sketch a set of information templates as successive conceptual instantiations of our theoretical exploration. As authorities are still debating on how to use emergent groups effectively, our attempt to outline a foundation of information analysis beyond the rational decision-making paradigm is a systematic and necessary step towards effective decision support to the volunteer-helpers.

Keywords

Information requirements Disaster management Emergent groups motivation Information processing Template Decision support 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Pacific Research Institute for Information Systems Management (PRIISM)Shidler College of BusinessHonoluluUSA

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