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Crises and Old Age Policy

  • Carroll L. Estes
Chapter
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

The theme of crisis is a central motif resonating throughout the contemporary U.S. welfare state that is particularly salient for old age politics and policy. To understand these issues, analysis must attend to crisis construction and crisis management by the state and the role of other interests and actors in the economic, political, and civil sectors of society.

Keywords

Social Security Welfare State Social Movement Debt Crisis Public Sociology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer New York 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Health & AgingUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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