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Hairy Root Cultures for Secondary Metabolites Production

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Bio-Farms for Nutraceuticals

Part of the book series: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology ((AEMB,volume 698))

Abstract

Hairy roots (HRs) are differentiated cultures of transformed roots generated by the infection of wounded higher plants with Agrobacterium rhizogenes. This pathogen causes the HR disease leading to the neoplastic growth of roots that are characterized by high growth rate in hormone free media and genetic stability. HRs produce the same phytochemicals pattern of the corresponding wild type organ. High stability and productivity features allow the exploitation of HRs as valuable biotechnological tool for the production of plant secondary metabolites. In addition, several elicitation methods can be used to further enhance their accumulation in both small and large scale production. However, in the latter case, cultivation in bioreactors should be still optimized. HRs can be also utilised as biological farm for the production of recombinant proteins, hence holding additional potential for industrial use. HR technology has been strongly improved by increased knowledge of molecular mechanisms underlying their development. The present review summarizes updated aspects of the hairy root induction, genetics and metabolite production.

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Pistelli, L., Giovannini, A., Ruffoni, B., Bertoli, A., Pistelli, L. (2010). Hairy Root Cultures for Secondary Metabolites Production. In: Giardi, M.T., Rea, G., Berra, B. (eds) Bio-Farms for Nutraceuticals. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol 698. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-7347-4_13

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