Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whales (Delphinapterus leucas) in Cook Inlet, Alaska

  • Marc O. Lammers
  • Robert Small
  • Shannon Atkinson
  • Manuel Castellote
  • Justin Jenniges
  • Anne Rosinski
  • Sue Moore
  • Chris Garner
  • Whitlow W. L. Au
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 730)

Abstract

Beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) in Cook Inlet, Alaska, are listed as endangered and share habitats with a variety of anthropogenic activities including coastal development, oil and gas exploration, shipping, and military activities. Their population has declined from an estimated 653 animals in 1994 to 321 in 2009 (Hobbs et al. 2009). As a result, there is an urgent need for data that will help regulatory agencies such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Alaska’s Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) implement effective management and recovery plans. Among the principal types of information needed are quantifiable measures of seasonal presence in the inlet, temporal and spatial patterns of habitat preference, and the occurrence of animals in areas impacted or considered for industrial development.

Keywords

Shipping 

References

  1. Hobbs RC, Sims CL, Shelden KEW, Rugh DJ (2009) Estimated abundance of beluga whales in Cook Inlet, Alaska, from aerial surveys conducted in June 2009. Unpublished Report, National Marine Mammal Laboratory, National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA.Google Scholar
  2. Lammers MO, Brainard RE, Au WWL, Mooney TA, Wong K (2008) An ecological acoustic recorder (EAR) for long-term monitoring of biological and anthropogenic sounds on coral reefs and other marine habitats. J Acoust Soc Am 123:1720–1728.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc O. Lammers
    • 1
  • Robert Small
    • 2
  • Shannon Atkinson
    • 3
  • Manuel Castellote
    • 4
  • Justin Jenniges
    • 5
  • Anne Rosinski
    • 1
  • Sue Moore
    • 4
  • Chris Garner
    • 6
  • Whitlow W. L. Au
    • 1
  1. 1.Hawai’i Institute of Marine BiologyKane’oheUSA
  2. 2.Alaska Department of Fish and GameJuneauUSA
  3. 3.Juneau Fisheries, School of Fisheries and Ocean SciencesUniversity of Alaska FairbanksJuneauUSA
  4. 4.National Marine Mammal LaboratoryNational Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationSeattleUSA
  5. 5.Alaska SeaLife CenterSewardUSA
  6. 6.United States ArmyFort RichardsonUSA

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