Barotrauma in Fish and Barotrauma Metrics

Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 730)

Abstract

In general terms, barotrauma is defined as an injury or disorder resulting from the establishment of a pressure difference across the wall of an anatomical structure or an injury of a body part or organ as a result of changes in pressure. In fish, barotrauma is physiological damage to nonauditory tissue. Barotrauma may be expressed as physical injury or changes in behavior and may result in immediate or delayed direct or indirect mortality.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, BattelleRichlandUSA

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