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Getting to Performance-Based Outcomes at the Watershed Level

  • Lois Wright MortonEmail author
  • Jean McGuire
Chapter

Abstract

The on-farm performance-based environmental management approach gives farmers direct feedback (using agronomic indicators) that help them evaluate how their daily management practices affect local water quality. The approach encourages flexible and adaptive management at the farm level. A council of local farmers in Iowa’s Hewitt Creek watershed has modeled a resident-led performance incentive program that has reduced pollutant loading and improved soil and water quality. Interviews with council members document the individual and group social processes that changed farmers’ knowledge and actions.

Keywords

Water Quality Improve Water Quality Farm Group Water Quality Issue Fecal Coliform Bacterium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyIowa State UniversityAmesUSA

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