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The Role of Force and Economic Sanctions in Protecting Watersheds

  • Kristen CoreyEmail author
  • Lois Wright Morton
Chapter

Abstract

Sometimes changes in landscape management for the protection and improvement of water resources are the result of legislative force and economic sanctions rather than the direct influence of citizens. Data collected among local landowners, City of Lincoln planners, agencies and conservation organizations are used to evaluate the results of invoking the national Endangered Species Act as a strategy for protecting a unique ecosystem, the Eastern Nebraska Saline Wetlands. Difficulties in resource management decisions are presented by examining the conflicting perspectives of an expanding urban area, agricultural interests and multiple levels of government.

Keywords

Green Space Natural Resource Conservation Service Tiger Beetle Planning Official Conservation Easement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Iowa State UniversityAnkenyUSA

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