Local Champions Speak Out: Pennsylvania’s Community Watershed Organizations

  • Kathryn J. Brasier
  • Brian Lee
  • Richard Stedman
  • Jason Weigle
Chapter

Abstract

Community-based watershed organizations (CWOs) are non-governmental, non-profit, voluntary organizations with a water-related theme or mission. Interview data collected from 56 Pennsylvania CWOs are examined for evidence of social outcomes from collaborative management approaches that include local citizens. CWO members’ actions have multiple effects in their communities: environmental education and behavior change, and positive “unintended” outcomes that build local capacity at multiple levels for leadership, partnerships and policy impact.

Keywords

Manganese Transportation Fishing Grease 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We gratefully acknowledge funding from the Center for Rural Pennsylvania for this project.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathryn J. Brasier
    • 1
  • Brian Lee
  • Richard Stedman
  • Jason Weigle
  1. 1.Department of Agricultural Economics & Rural SociologyPenn State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA

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