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Upstream, Downstream: Forging a Rural–Urban Partnership for Shared Water Governance in Central Kansas

  • Theresa SelfaEmail author
  • Terrie A. Becerra
Chapter

Abstract

Watershed partnerships draw together diverse stakeholder groups to collectively negotiate the management of their water resources. A policy network analysis is used to examine the rural–urban governance partnership formed to protect Cheney Lake Reservoir, the drinking water source for Wichita, KS. Vertical and horizontal linkages were critical in the creation of a partnership between agricultural producers in the watershed, via the Cheney Lake Watershed Inc. (CLWI) organization, and the City of Wichita in which both sides recognized shared ownership and responsibility for the reservoir.

Keywords

Integrate Water Resource Management Water Governance Policy Network Natural Resource Conservation Service Protect Water Quality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Lisa French and Howard Miller of the Cheney Lake Watershed Inc. and all of the farmers in the watershed who were willing to talk with us. The research was funded by USDA CEAP program.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Environmental StudiesSUNY College of Environmental Science and ForestrySyracuseUSA

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