3D-IC Technology Using Ultra-Thin Chips

Chapter

Abstract

Various generic methods for the three-dimensional (3D) integration of integrated circuits (ICs) are discussed. All these methods rely on ultra-thin chips. Wafer-to-wafer bonding, chip-to-wafer bonding, multichip-to-wafer bonding and reconfigured wafer-to-wafer bonding are described and compared. Several test chips fabricated by that use some of those concepts are briefly mentioned. Finally, specific concerns related to 3D-IC integration that use ultra-thin chips are indicated.

Keywords

SiO2 Dioxide Epoxy Shrinkage Retina 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe)Tohoku UniversitySendaiJapan

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