Chasing Ghosts: Comparative Mapping in the Brassicaceae

Chapter
Part of the Plant Genetics and Genomics: Crops and Models book series (PGG, volume 9)

Abstract

The study of plant genome organization has benefited greatly from the application of comparative genetic mapping, which allows both the elucidation of chromosomal rearrangements resulting from speciation and the ability to transfer information and resources between species. A significant focus of comparative mapping in the Brassicaceae has been within the agronomically important species of the Brassica genera and between the Brassica crops and their well-characterized relative Arabidopsis thaliana. These studies have demonstrated the ghostly remnants of an hexaploid ancestor in the evolutionary past of the Brassica diploids that explain the observed levels of gene duplication within the genomes. Further, comparative mapping with A. thaliana has uncovered a segmental architecture of conserved ancestral blocks which can be replicated and rearranged to reflect the current genomes of all members of the Brassicaceae studied to date. The correspondence between the A. thaliana and Brassica genomic regions is being exploited to fine map, identify, and clone genes for economically valuable traits.

Keywords

Homology Collinearity Conserved genome blocks Polyploidy Chromosomal rearrangements 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Agriculture and Agri-Food CanadaSaskatoon Research CentreSaskatoonCanada

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