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Social Identity, Motivation, andWell Being Among Adolescents from Asian and Latin American Backgrounds

  • Andrew J. Fuligni
Chapter
Part of the Nebraska Symposium on Motivation book series (NSM, volume 57)

Abstract

Youth from Asian and Latin American backgrounds, the fastest rising minority groups in American society, face numerous challenges to their successful development. The majority of these adolescents have immigrant parents and many of them were born in another country themselves, creating the need to adapt and adjust to a new and different society (Hernandez, 2004). The youths’ families come from cultural backgrounds that include beliefs, values, and traditions that often differ from the dominant norms in American society. As ethnic minorities, they face social stereotypes that attempt to limit and constrain their abilities, resources, and potential (Fuligni, 2007)

Keywords

Social Identity Ethnic Identity Academic Motivation Family Obligation Family Identity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer New York 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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