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Promoting Rural Livelihoods and Public Health Through Poultry Contracting: Evidence from Thailand

  • Samuel Heft-Neal
  • David Roland-Holst
  • Songsak Sriboonchitta
  • Anaspree Chaiwan
  • Joachim Otte
Chapter
Part of the Natural Resource Management and Policy book series (NRMP, volume 36)

Abstract

Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) first emerged in Southeast Asia in 2003–2004. Initially, containment policies ranged from focusing on mass culling (Thailand) and vaccination (Vietnam) to the elimination of all wet markets (Hong Kong). Although these measures were applied with varied success, it has become clear that a new generation of policies is necessary to address the infrequent, but continued, outbreaks of an apparently endemic disease. The nature of these circumstances require that the new generation of policies focus on long term adjustment and take into account acceptable risk levels, farmer livelihoods, and financial sustainability. It is within this context that we look at geographical potential for medium scale contract farming in the informal poultry sector in Thailand.

Keywords

Informal Sector Market Access Formal Sector Broiler Chicken Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Food and Agriculture Organization of the United States 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel Heft-Neal
    • 1
  • David Roland-Holst
    • 1
  • Songsak Sriboonchitta
    • 2
  • Anaspree Chaiwan
    • 2
  • Joachim Otte
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Agricultural and Resource EconomicsUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.Department of EconomicsChiang Mai UniversityChiang MaiThailand
  3. 3.Food and Agriculture Organization of the United NationsRomeItaly

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