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Treatments to Increase Social Awareness and Social Skills

  • Suzannah J. Ferraioli
  • Sandra L. Harris
Chapter

Abstract

There is an extensive literature on methods for increasing the social awareness and social skills of people with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) of every diagnostic category and every age. This work varies in research quality from the mediocre to the exemplary, although the exemplary are outnumbered by the less rigorous. One reason for the focus on treating social behaviors is that qualitative impairments in social interaction are intrinsic to ASDs (APA 2000). To support people on the autism spectrum in learning sufficient social behavior to move with reasonable comfort within the wider “neurotypical” society, a great deal of work needs to be done by them and by us to help them master sufficient knowledge and skills to handle social encounters. Our teaching methods should be efficient and effective.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder Social Skill Asperger Syndrome Joint Attention Video Modeling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

ADHD

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

ADI-R

Autism Diagnostic Interview – revised

ADOS

Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule

ASDs

Autism spectrum disorders

CARS

Childhood Autism Rating Scale

CBT

Cognitive behavioral therapy

CGI

Clinical global improvement

DSM-IV-TR

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th edition

MBD

Multiple baseline design

NIMH

National Institutes of Mental Health

OCD

Obsessive–compulsive disorder

ODD

Oppositional defiant disorder

PCIT

Parent–child interaction therapy

PDD-NOS

Pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified

RCT

Randomized control trial

RUPP

Research Units on Pediatric Psychopharmacology

SRS

Social Responsiveness Scale

SSED

Single subject experimental design

SST

Social skills training

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Suzannah J. Ferraioli
    • 1
  • Sandra L. Harris
    • 1
  1. 1.Douglas Developmental Disabilities Center, RutgersThe State University of New JerseyNew BrunswickUSA

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