Advertisement

To Tame a Land: Archaeological Cultures and the Spread of the Neolithic in Western Europe

  • Marc Vander Linden
Chapter

Abstract

This paper explores the significance of “archaeological cultures” for the investigation of the neolithisation of Europe (i.e. introduction of agriculture of livestock raising). Instead of resorting to general preconceived models, the use of archaeological cultures as a unit of analysis forces to consider the multiplicity of processes of cultural transmission at play in this transition. This study explores these questions for western Europe, especially present-day France and British Isles. It is shown that this large area witnesses multiple episodes of neolithisation, corresponding to an original recombination of the material traits in presence, partly related to the demographic history of the human communities involved. Elements of comparison with the eastern Mediterranean sequence suggest the recurrence of this process of recombination, which suggests the existence of a level of coherence behind the mosaic of local idiosyncrasies that characterise the neolithisation of Europe.

Keywords

Material Culture British Isle Cultural Transmission Paris Basin Poppy Seed 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was funded by the Leverhulme Fund and the “Formation of Europe – prehistoric population dynamics and the roots of socio-cultural diversity” program of the European Commission (NEST). The constant support by members of the latter project, especially A. Shukurov and J.-P. Bocquet-Appel, made the realisation of this paper possible. Several other colleagues have also been instrumental in the (very long) shaping of these ideas, in particular Richard Bradley, James Conolly, Cameron Petrie, Ryan Rabett and my co-editor, Ben Roberts. Special thanks to Frank Herbert and Steve Harris for the title. Of course, I remain solely responsible for all mistakes, omissions and/or misinterpretations to be found here.

References

  1. Allaby, R.G., Fuller, D.Q. and Brown T.A. (2008). The genetic expectations of a protacted model for the origins of domesticated crops. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 105: 13982–13986.Google Scholar
  2. Allard, P. (2007). The Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in the Paris basin: a review. In Whittle A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 211–223.Google Scholar
  3. Ammerman, A.J. and Cavalli-Sforza, L.L. (1971). Measuring the rate of spread of early farming in Europe. Man N.S. 6 (4): 674–688.Google Scholar
  4. Ammerman, A.J. and Cavalli-Sforza, L.L. (1984). The Neolithic transition and the genetics of population in Europe, Princeton University Press, Princeton.Google Scholar
  5. Andersen, S.H. (2008). The Mesolithic – Neolithic transition in western Denmark seen from a kitchen midden perspective. A survey. Analecta Praehistorica Leidensia 40: 67–74.Google Scholar
  6. Arbogast, R.-M. (1994). Premiers élevages néolithiques du Nord-Est de la France, E.R.A.U.L. 67, Liège.Google Scholar
  7. Arias, P. (2007). Neighbours but diverse: social change in North-West Iberia during the transition from the Mesolithic to the Neolithic (5500–4000 cal BC). In Whittle A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 53–71.Google Scholar
  8. Asouti, E. (2006). Beyond the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B interaction sphere. Journal of World prehistory 20: 87–126.Google Scholar
  9. Augereau, A. (1998). Premières données sur l’organisation spatiale de la production lithique en contexte minier et domestique du IVe au IIIe millénaire dans le sud-est du Bassin parisien. Anthropologie et Préhistoire 109: 237–247.Google Scholar
  10. Aurenche, O., Galet, P., Régagnon-Caroline, E. and Evin, J. (2001). Proto-Neolithic and Neolithic cultures in the Middle East – the birth of agriculture, livestock raising, and ceramics. A calibrated 14C chronology 12,500–5500 cal BC. Radiocarbon 43 (3): 1191–1202.Google Scholar
  11. Axelrod, R. (1997). The Dissemination of Culture: A Model with Local Convergence and Global Polarization. The Journal of Conflict Resolution 41 (2): 203–226.Google Scholar
  12. Bakels, C.C. (1992). Fruits and seeds from the Linearbandkeramik settlement at Meindling, Germany, with special reference to Papaver somniferum. Analecta Praehistorica Leidensia 25: 55–68.Google Scholar
  13. Barbaza, M., Guilaine, J. and Vaquer, J. (1984). Fondements chrono-culturels du mésolithique en Languedoc occidental. L’anthropologie 88: 345–365.Google Scholar
  14. Barberena, R. and Borrero, L.A. (2005). Stable isotopes and faunal bones. Comments on Milner et al. 2004. Antiquity 79: 191–195.Google Scholar
  15. Barker, G. (2006). The agricultural revolution in prehistory: why did foragers become farmers? Oxford University Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
  16. Bayliss, A,. Whittle, A. W. R. and Healy, F. 2008. Timing, tempo and temporalities in the early Neolithic of southern Britain. Analecta Praehistorica Leidensia 40: 25–42.Google Scholar
  17. Beeching, A., Binder, D., Blanchet, J.-C. et al. (eds) (1991). Identité du Chasséen. Actes du ­colloque international de Nemours 1989, Mémoires du Musée de Préhistoire d’Ile-de-France, Nemours.Google Scholar
  18. Bentley, R.A. and Shennan, S. (2003). Cultural Transmission and Stochastic Network Growth. American Antiquity 68 (3): 459–485.Google Scholar
  19. Berger, J.-F. and Guilaine, J. (2009). The 8200 calBP abrupt environmental change and the Neolithic transition: a Mediterranean perspective. Quaternary International 200 (1–2): 31–49.Google Scholar
  20. Beyneix, A. (2007). Les comportements funéraires au Néolithique en France méridionale: une vue d’ensemble. L’anthropologie 111: 68–78.Google Scholar
  21. Biel, J., Schlichtherle, H., Strobel, M. and Zeeb, A. (ed.) (1998). Die Michelsberger Kultur und ihre Randgebiete – Probleme der Entshehung, Chroonologie und des Siedlungswesens. K Kolloquium 21.–23. Februar 1997, Kommissionsverlag K. Theiss, Stuttgart.Google Scholar
  22. Blankholm, H.B. (2007). Southern Scandinavia. In Bailey, G.N. and Spikins, P. (eds) Mesolithic Europe, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 107–131.Google Scholar
  23. Bocquet-Appel, J.-P. (2002). Paleoanthropological traces of a Neolithic demographic transition. Current Anthropology 43: 638–650.Google Scholar
  24. Bocquet-Appel, J.-P. (2005). La transition démographique néolithique. In Guilaine, J. (dir.) Populations néolithiques et environnements. Séminaire du Collège de France, Errance, Paris, pp. 11–20.Google Scholar
  25. Bocquet-Appel, J.-P. and Bar-Yosef, O. (eds) (2008). The Neolithic demographic transition and its consequences, Springer, New-York.Google Scholar
  26. Bocquet-Appel, J.-P. and Dubouloz, J. (2003). Traces paléoanthropologiques et archéologiques d’une transition démographique néolithique en Europe. Bulletin de la Société Préhistorique Française 100 (4): 699–714.Google Scholar
  27. Bocquet-Appel, J.-P. and Dubouloz, J. (2004). Expected palaeoanthropological and archaeological signal from a Neolithic demographic transition on a worldwide scale. Documenta Praehistorica XXXI: 25–33.Google Scholar
  28. Bocquet-Appel, J.-P. and Naji, S. (2006). Testing the hypothesis of a worldwide neolithic demographic transition. Corroboration from American cemeteries (with comments). Current Anthropology 47 (2): 341–365.Google Scholar
  29. Bocquet-Appel, J.-P., Naji, S., Vander Linden, M. and Kozlowski, J. (2009). Detection of diffusion and contact zones of early farming in Europe from the space-time distribution of 14C dates. Journal of Archaeological Science 36: 807–820.Google Scholar
  30. Bogaard, A. and Jones, G. (2007). Neolithic farming in Britain and central Europe: contrast or continuity? In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 357–375.Google Scholar
  31. Bonsall, C., Macklin, M. G., Anderson, D. E. and Payton, R. W. (2002). Climate change and the adoption of agriculture in north-west Europe. European Journal of Archaeology 5 (1): 9–23.Google Scholar
  32. Bostyn, F. and Lanchon Y. (eds) (1992). Jablines “Le Haut Château” (Seine-et-Marne). Une minière de silex au Néolithique, Editions de la Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, Paris.Google Scholar
  33. Bradley, R. (2007). The prehistory of Britain and Ireland, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  34. Bradley, R. (2008). The end of the beginning: changing configurations in the British and Irish Neolithic. Analecta Praehistorica Leidensia 40: 43–49.Google Scholar
  35. Bradley, R. and Edmonds, M. (1993). Interpreting the Axe Trade, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  36. Briois, F., Gratuze, B. and Guilaine, J. (1997). Obsidiennes du site néolithique précéramique de Shillourokambos (Chypre). Paléorient 23 (1): 95–112.Google Scholar
  37. Broodbank, C. and Strasser, T.S. (1991). Migrant farmers and the colonization of Crete. Antiquity 65: 233–245.Google Scholar
  38. Brophy, K. (2007). From big houses to cult houses: early Neolithic timber halls in Scotland. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 73: 75–96.Google Scholar
  39. Brown, A. (2007). Dating the onset of cereal cultivation in Britain and Ireland: the evidence from charred cereal grains. Antiquity 81: 1042–1052.Google Scholar
  40. Byrd, B.F. (1994). Public and Private, Domestic and Corporate: The Emergence of the Southwest Asian Village. American Antiquity 59 (4): 639–666.Google Scholar
  41. Case, H. (1969). Neolithic explanations. Antiquity 43: 176–186.Google Scholar
  42. Cauvin, J. (1994). Naissance des divinités, naissance de l’agriculture. La révolution des symboles au Néolithique, C.N.R.S., Paris.Google Scholar
  43. Cauwe, N., Vander Linden, M. and Vanmontfort, B. (2001). The Middle and Late Neolithic. Anthropologica et Praehistorica 112: 77–89.Google Scholar
  44. Cavalli-Sforza, L.L. and Feldman, M.W. (1981). Cultural transmission: a quantitative approach, Princeton University Press, Princeton.Google Scholar
  45. Clark, G. (1966). The invasion hypothesis in prehistory. Antiquity 49: 172–189.Google Scholar
  46. Clarke, D. (1968). Analytical archaeology, Methuen, London.Google Scholar
  47. Cohen, M.N. (1975). Archaeological Evidence for Population Pressure in Pre-Agricultural Societies. American Antiquity 40 (4): 471–475.Google Scholar
  48. Colledge, S., Conolly, J. and Shennan, S. (2004). Archaeobotanical evidence for the spread of farming in the Eastern Mediterranean (with comments). Current Anthropology 45 (supplement): 35–58.Google Scholar
  49. Collet, H. Deramaix, I., Sartieaux, P.P. and Vander Linden, M. (1997). Fouille d’un puits d’extraction de silex à Petit-Spiennes (Hainaut). Notae Praehistoricae 17: 203–212.Google Scholar
  50. Collet, H., Jadin, I. and Woodbury, M. (2008). Apport à la chronologie absolue des minières de Spiennes. Notae Praehistoricae 28: 97–99.Google Scholar
  51. Conolly, J., Colledge, S. and Shennan, S. (2008). Founder effect, drift, and adaptive change in domestic crop use in early Neolithic Europe. Journal of Archaeological Science 35: 2797–2804.Google Scholar
  52. Constantin, C. and Blanchet, J.-C. (1998). Le nord de la France (bassin parisien). In Guilaine, J. (dir.) Atlas du Néolithique européen II. L’Europe occidentale, E.R.A.U.L. 46, Liège, pp. 585–651.Google Scholar
  53. Cooney, G. (2007). Parallel worlds or multi-stranded identities? Considering the process of ‘going over’ in Ireland and the Irish Sea zone. In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 543–566.Google Scholar
  54. Copley. M.S., Berstan, R., Mukherjee, A.J., Dudd, S.N., Straker, V., Payne, S. and Evershed, R.P. (2005a). Dairying in antiquity. III. Evidence for absorbed lipid residues dating to the British Neolithic. Journal of Archaeological Science 32: 523–546.Google Scholar
  55. Copley. M.S., Berstan, R., Mukherjee, A.J., Dudd, S.N., Aillaud, S., Straker, V., Payne, S. and Evershed, R.P. (2005b). Processing of milk products in pottery vessels through British prehistory. Antiquity 79: 895–908.Google Scholar
  56. Costa, L.J., Sternke, F. and Woodman, P.C. (2005). Microlith to macrolith: the reasons behind the transformation of production in the Irish Mesolithic. Antiquity 79: 19–33.Google Scholar
  57. Cottiaux, R., Durbet, G., Hachem, L. and Martial, E. (2008). L’enceinte du Néolithique moyen de Maisons-Alfort “ZAC d’Alfort” (Val-de-Marne). Internéo 7: 71–86.Google Scholar
  58. Crombé, P. (dir.) (2005). The last hunter-gatherer-fishermen in sandy Flanders (NW Belgium). Verrebroeck and Doel excavation projects. Volume 1: palaeo-environment, chronology and features. Archaeological Reports Ghent University 3, Academia Press, Ghent.Google Scholar
  59. Crombé, P., Perdaen, Y. and Sergant, J. (2005). La néolithisation de la Belgique: quelques réflexions. In Marchand, G. and Tresset, A. (dir.) Unité et diversité des processus de néolithisation de la façade atlantique de l’Europe (6e-4e millénaires avant J.-C.). Table ronde de Nantes, 26–27 avril 2002. Mémoire XXXVI de la Société Préhistorique Française, Société Préhistorique Française, Paris, pp. 47–66.Google Scholar
  60. Crombé, P. and Vanmontfort, B. (2007). The neolithisation of the Schledt basin in western Belgium. In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 263–285.Google Scholar
  61. Crombé, P. & Sergant, J. (2008). Tracing the Neolithic in the lowlands of Belgium: the evidence from sandy Flanders. Analecta Praehistorica Leidensia 40: 75–84.Google Scholar
  62. Cucchi, T. Vigne, J.-D., Auffray, J.-C., Croft, P. and Peltenburg, E. (2002). Introduction involontaire de la souris domestique (Mus musculus domesticus) à Chypre dès le Néolithique précéramique ancien (fin IXe et VIIIe millénaires av. J.-C.). Compte-rendus Palevol 1: 235–241.Google Scholar
  63. Cummings, V. (2007). From midden to megalith? The Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in western Britain. In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 493–510.Google Scholar
  64. David, N. and Kramer, C. (2001). Ethnoarchaeology in action, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  65. Demoule, J.-P., Dubouloz, J. and Manolakakis, L. (2005). L’émergence des premières sociétés complexes (4500–3500). In Demoule, J.-P. (dir) La révolution néolithique en France, La Découverte, Paris, pp. 61–77.Google Scholar
  66. Dolukhanov, P. and Shukurov, A. (2004). Modelling the Neolithic dispersal in northern Eurasia. Documenta Praehistorica XXXI: 35–47.Google Scholar
  67. Dolukhanov, P., Shukurov, A., Gronenborn, D., Sokoloff D., Timofeev, V. and Zaitseva, G. (2005). The chronology of Neolithic dispersal in central and eastern Europe. Journal of Archaeological Science 32: 1441–1458.Google Scholar
  68. Dubouloz, J. (2003). Datation absolue du premier Néolithique du Bassin parisien: complément et relecture des données RRBP et VSG. Bulletin de la Société Préhistorique Française 100: 671–689.Google Scholar
  69. Edmonds, M. (1995). Stone tools and society: working stone in Neolithic and Bronze Age Britain, Batsford, London.Google Scholar
  70. Eerkens, J.W. and Lipo, C.P. (2005). Cultural transmission, copying errors, and the genration of variation in material culture and the archaeological record. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 24: 316–324.Google Scholar
  71. Eerkens, J.W. and Lipo, C.P. (2007). Cultural transmission theory and the archaeological record: providing context to understanding variation and temporal changes in material culture. Journal of Archaeological Research 15: 239–274.Google Scholar
  72. Evershed, R.P. (2007). Exploiting molecular and isotopic signals at the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition. In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 141–164.Google Scholar
  73. Forenbaher, S. and Miracle, P. (2005). The spread of farming in the Eastern Adriatic. Antiquity 79: 514–528.Google Scholar
  74. Fromont, N. (2005). Les anneaux en pierre dans le Nord de la France et la Belgique au Néolithique ancien: structuration des productions et circulation des matières premières. In Marchand, G. and Tresset, A. (dir.) Unité et diversité des processus de néolithisation de la façade atlantique de l’Europe (6e–4e millénaires avant J.-C.). Table ronde de Nantes, 26–27 avril 2002. Mémoire XXXVI de la Société Préhistorique Française, Société Préhistorique Française, Paris, pp. 203–212.Google Scholar
  75. Gassin, B., Astruc, L., Léa, V., Philibert, S. and Gibaja Bao, J.F. (2006). Burins du Chasséen méridional. Archéologiques 2: 319–341.Google Scholar
  76. Gassin, B., Léa, V., Linton, J. and Astruc, L. (2006). Production, gestion et utilisation des outillages lithiques du Chasséenn méridional. In Astruc, L., Bon, F., Léa, V., Milcent, P.-Y. and Philibert, S. (dir.) Normes techniques et pratiques sociales. De la simplicité des outillages pré- et protohistoriques, APDCA, Antibes, pp. 223–33.Google Scholar
  77. Gebel, H.G. (2004). There was no centre: the polycentric evolution of the Near Eastern Neolithic. Neo-lithics 1/04: 28–32.Google Scholar
  78. Ghesquière, E., Marcigny, C., Desloges, J. and Charraud, F. (2008). La production de lames en silex bathonien dans la plaine de Caen: redécouverte de la minière des Longrais à Soumont-Saint-Quentin (Calvados). Internéo 7: 103–119.Google Scholar
  79. Guilaine, J. and Manen, C. (2007). From Mesolithic to Early Neolithic in the western Mediterranean. In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 21–51.Google Scholar
  80. Hartz, S., Lübke, H. and Terberger, T. (2007). From fish and seal to sheep and cattle: new research on the process of neolithisation in northern Germany. In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 567–594.Google Scholar
  81. Hassan, F.A. (1979). Demography and archaeology. Annual Review of Anthropology 8: 137–160.Google Scholar
  82. Hauzeur, A. (2001). Affinités et influences dans le Néolithique ancien d’Europe occidentale: le Rubané de la moyenne vallée de la Moselle et la culture de Blicquy-Villeneuve-Saint-Germain. In Préhistoire de la Grande Plaine d’Europe du Nord. Actes du colloque Chaire Francqui interuniversitaire au titre étranger (Université de Liège, 26 Juin 2001), E.R.A.U.L. 99, Liège, pp. 167–82.Google Scholar
  83. Gronenborn, D. (2007). Beyond the models: ‘Neolithisation’ in central Europe. In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe,British Academy, London, pp. 73–98.Google Scholar
  84. Heim, J. and Jadin, I. (1998). Sur les traces de l’orge et du pavot. L’agriculture danubienne de Hesbaye sous influence, entre Rhin et Bassin parisien. Anthropologie et Préhistoire 109: 187–205.Google Scholar
  85. Hey, G. and Barclay, A. (2007). The Thames valley in the late fifth and early fourth millennium cal BC: the appearance of domestication and the evidence for change. In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 399–422.Google Scholar
  86. Hodder, I. (1990). The domestication of Europe, Blackwell, Oxford.Google Scholar
  87. Holgate, R. (1995). Neolithic flint mining in Britain. Archaeologia Polona 33: 133–161.Google Scholar
  88. Horwitz, L.K., Tchernov, E., Ducos, P., Becker, C., von den Driesch, A., Martin, L. and Garrard, A. (1999). Animal domestication in southern Levant. Paléorient 25 (2): 63–80.Google Scholar
  89. Jadin, I. (2003). Trois petits tours et puis s’en vont… La fin de la présence danubienne en Moyenne Belgique, E.R.A.U.L. 109, Liège.Google Scholar
  90. Jeunesse, C., Lefranc, P., Denaire, A. and Naze, A. (2004). Groupe de Bischheim, origine du Michelsberg, genèse du groupe d’Entzheim. La transition entre le Néolithique moyen et le Néolithique récent dans les régions rhénanes, Cahiers de l’Association pour la Promotion de la Recherche Archéologique en Alsace 18/19, Zimmersheim.Google Scholar
  91. Jones, M. and Brown, T. (2000). Agricultural origins: the evidence of modern and ancient DNA. The Holocene 10 (6): 769–776.Google Scholar
  92. Keeley, L.H. and Cahen, D. (1989). Early Neolithic forts and villages in NE Belgium: a preliminary report. Journal of Field Archaeology 16 (2): 157–176.Google Scholar
  93. Kozlowski, S.K. and Aurenche, O. (2005). Territories, boundaries and cultures in the Near East. British Archaeological Reports International Series 1362. Archaeopress, Oxford.Google Scholar
  94. Krause, R. (1998). L’habitat rubané à enceinte et à nécropole de Vaihingen an der Enz (Bade-Wurtemberg): fouilles 1994–1997. Anthropologie et Préhistoire 109: 27–40.Google Scholar
  95. Kuijt, I. (2000). People and Space in Early Agricultural Villages: Exploring Daily Lives, Community Size, and Architecture in the Late Pre-Pottery Neolithic. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 19: 75–102.Google Scholar
  96. Kuijt, I. and Going-Morris, N. (2002). Foraging, farming, and social complexity in the Pre-Pottery Neolithic of the southern Levant: a review and synthesis. Journal of World Prehistory 16 (4): 361–440.Google Scholar
  97. Laporte, L. (2005). Néolithisations de la façade atlantique du Centre-Ouest de l’Ouest de la France. In Marchand, G. and Tresset, A. (dir.) Unité et diversité des processus de néolithisation de la façade atlantique de l’Europe (6e–4e millénaires avant J.-C.). Table ronde de Nantes, 26–27 avril 2002. Mémoire XXXVI de la Société Préhistorique Française, Société Préhistorique Française, Paris, pp. 99–125.Google Scholar
  98. Laporte, L. and Le Roux, C.-T. (2004). Bâtisseurs du Néolithique. Mégalithismes de l’Ouest de France, La Maison des Roches, Paris.Google Scholar
  99. Larsson, L. (2007). Mistrust traditions, consider innovations? The Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in southern Scandinavia. In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 595–616.Google Scholar
  100. Léa, V. (2004). Centres de production et diffusion des silex bédouliens au Chasséen. Gallia Préhistoire 46: 231–250.Google Scholar
  101. Léa, V., Gassin, B. and Brois, F. (2004). Fonctionnement des réseaux de diffusion des silex bédouliens du Vème au IVème millénaire: questions ouvertes. In Dartevelle, H. (ed.) Auvergne et Midi, actualité de la recherche. Actes des cinquièmes rencontres méridionales de préhistoire récente, Clermont-Ferrand, 2002, Préhistoire du Sud-Ouest, Cressensac, pp. 405–420.Google Scholar
  102. Lemonnier, P. (1986). The study of material culture today: towards an anthropology of technical systems. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 5: 147–186.Google Scholar
  103. Leroi-Gourhan, A. (1943). Evolution et techniques, vol. 1, L’homme et la matière; vol. 2, Milieu et techniques, Albin Michel, Paris.Google Scholar
  104. Louwe Kooijmans, L. P. (2005). Hunters become farmers. Early Neolithic B and Middle Neolithic A. In Louwe Kooijmans, L.P., van den Broeke, P.W., Fokkens, H. and van Gijn, A.L. (eds) The prehistory of the Netherlands volume 1, Amsterdam University Press, Amsterdam, pp. 249–271.Google Scholar
  105. Malone, C. (2003). The Italian Neolithic: a synthesis of research. Journal of World Prehistory 17 (3): 235–312.Google Scholar
  106. Manen, C. and Sabatier, P. (2003). Chronique de la néolithisation en Méditerranée nord-occidentale. Bulletin de la Société Préhistorique Française 100 (3): 479–504.Google Scholar
  107. Marchand, G. (2005a). Le Mésolithique final en Bretagne: une combinaison des faits archéologiques. In Marchand, G. and Tresset, A. (dir.) Unité et diversité des processus de néolithisation de la façade atlantique de l’Europe (6e–4e millénaires avant J.-C.). Table ronde de Nantes, 26–27 avril 2002. Mémoire XXXVI de la Société Préhistorique Française, Société Préhistorique Française, Paris, pp. 67–86.Google Scholar
  108. Marchand, G. (2005b). Contacts, blocages et filiations entre les aires culturelles mésolithiques et néolithiques en Europe atlantique. L’anthropologie 109: 541–556.Google Scholar
  109. Marchand, G. (2007). Neolithic fragrances: Mesolithic-Neolithic interactions in western France. In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 225–242.Google Scholar
  110. Marchand, G. and Manen, C. (2006). Le rôle du Néolithique ancien méditerranéen dans la Néolithisation de l’Europe atlantique. In 6emes rencontres méridionales de Préhistoire récente, ADCPA, Antibes, pp. 213–232.Google Scholar
  111. Marchand, G., Michel, S., Sellami, F., Bertin, F., Blanchet, F., Crowch, A., Dumarçay, G., Fouéré, P., Quesnel, L. and Tsogbou-Ahoupe, R. (2007). Un habitat de la fin du Mésolithique dans le Centre-Ouest de la France: L’Essart à Poitiers (Vienne). L’anthropologie 111: 10–38.Google Scholar
  112. Marchand, G. and Tresset, A. (dir.) (2005). Unité et diversité des processus de néolithisation de la façade atlantique de l’Europe (6e–4e millénaires avant J.-C.). Table ronde de Nantes, 26–27 avril 2002. Mémoire XXXVI de la Société Préhistorique Française, Société Préhistorique Française, Paris.Google Scholar
  113. Mauss, M. (1935). Les techniques du corps. Journal de Psychologie 32 (3–4): 271–293.Google Scholar
  114. Méniel, P. (1984). Les dépôts d’animaux chasséens dans le fossé du camp de Boury-en-Vexin (Oise): premières observations. Revue Archéologique de Picardie 1984 (1–2): 285–292.Google Scholar
  115. Milner, N.J., Craig, O.E., Bailey, G.N., Pedersen, K. and Andersen, S.H. (2004). Something fishy in the Neolithic? A re-evaluation of stable isotope analysis of Mesolithic and Neolithic coastal populations. Antiquity 78: 9–22.Google Scholar
  116. Milner, N.J. and Woodman, P.C. (2005). Combler les lacunes… L’événement le plus étudié, le mieux daté et le moins compris du Flandrien. In Marchand, G. and Tresset, A. (dir.) Unité et diversité des processus de néolithisation de la façade atlantique de l’Europe (6e–4e millénaires avant J.-C.). Table ronde de Nantes, 26–27 avril 2002. Mémoire XXXVI de la Société Préhistorique Française, Société Préhistorique Française, Paris, pp. 39–46.Google Scholar
  117. Olsen, K.M. and Gross, B.L. (2008). Detecting multiple origins of domesticated crops. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 105: 13701–13702.Google Scholar
  118. Pailler, Y. and Sheridan, A. (2009). Everything you always wanted to know about… la néolithisation de la Grande-Bretagne et de l’Irlande. Bulletin de la Société Préhistorique Française 106 (1): 25–56.Google Scholar
  119. Peltenburg, E., Colledge, S., Croft, P., Jackson, A., McCartney, C. and Murray, M.A. (2000). Agro-pastoralist colonization of Cyprus in the 10th millennium BP: initial assessments. Antiquity 74: 844–853.Google Scholar
  120. Perlès, C. (2001). The early Neolithic in Greece. The first farming communities in Europe, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  121. Perlès, C. (2003). An alternate (and old-fashioned) view of Neolithisation in Greece. Documenta Praehistorica XXX: 99–113.Google Scholar
  122. Pétrequin, P., Cassen, S., Croutsch, C. and Weller, O. (1997). Haches alpines et haches carnacéennes dans l’Europe du Ve millénaire. Notae Praehistoricae 17: 135–150.Google Scholar
  123. Pétrequin, P., Errera, M., Pétrequin, A.-M. and Allard, P. (2006). The Neolithic quarries of Mont Viso, Italy: initial radiocarbon dates. European Journal of Archaeology 9 (1): 7–30.Google Scholar
  124. Pétrequin, P., Sheridan, J. A., Cassen, S., Errera, M., Gauthier, E., Klassen, L., Le Maux, N. and Pailler, Y. (2008). Neolithic Alpine axeheads, from the Continent to Great Britain, the Isle of Man and Ireland. Analecta Praehistorica Leidensia 40: 261–279.Google Scholar
  125. Poulain, T. and Lange, G. (1984). Le camp chasséen de Jonquières (Oise): V. les vestiges humains. Revue archéologique de Picardie 1984 (1–2): 265–267.Google Scholar
  126. Raetzel-Fabian, D. (2002). Monumentality and communication. Neolithic enclosures and long distance tracks in West Central Europe. Available at http://www.jungsteinsite.de(accessed14–05–2009)
  127. Robinson, E. (2008). Scratching the surface. Surface scatters, armatures and forager-farmer contact in a ‘frontier zone’. Notae Praehistoricae 28: 55–62.Google Scholar
  128. Roussot-Laroque, J. (1998). Le sud-ouest de la France. In Guilaine, J. (dir.) Atlas du Néolithique européen II. L’Europe occidentale, E.R.A.U.L. 46, Liège, pp. 689–761.Google Scholar
  129. Roux, V. (1990). Le tour du potier. Spécialisation artisanale et compétence technique, C.N.R.S., Paris.Google Scholar
  130. Rowley-Conwy, P. (2004). How the west was lost. A reconsideration of agricultural origins in Britain, Ireland and southern Scandinavia (with comments). Current Anthropology 45 (supplement): 83–113.Google Scholar
  131. Scarre, C. (2002). Contexts of monumentalism: regional diversity at the Neolithic transition in north-western France. Oxford Journal of Archaeology 21 (1): 23–61.Google Scholar
  132. Scarre, C. (2007). Changing places: monuments and the Neolithic transition in western France. In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 243–261.Google Scholar
  133. Schulting, R.J. and Richards, M.P. (2002). The wet, the wild and the domesticated: The Mesolithic-Neolithic transition on the west coast of Scotland. European Journal of Archaeology 5 (2): 147–189.Google Scholar
  134. Sénépart, I. and Sidéra, I. (1991). Une culture chasséenne pour les matières dures animales? In Beeching, A., Binder, D., Blanchet, J.-C. et al. (eds) Identité du Chasséen. Actes du colloque international de Nemours 1989, Mémoires du Musée de Préhistoire d’Ile-de-France, Nemours, pp. 299–312.Google Scholar
  135. Shennan, S.J. (1989). Cultural transmission and cultural change. In van ver Leeuw, S. and Torrence, R. (eds.) What’s New? A Closer Look at the Process of Innovation, Routledge, London, pp. 330–346.Google Scholar
  136. Shennan, S.J. (2000). Population, culture history, and the dynamics of culture change (with ­comments). Current Anthropology 41 (5): 811–835.Google Scholar
  137. Shennan, S.J. and Edinborough, K. (2007). Prehistoric population history: from the Late Glacial to the Late Neolithic in central and northern Europe. Journal of Archaeological Science 34: 1339–1345.Google Scholar
  138. Shennan, S.J. and Wilkinson, J.R. (2001). Ceramic style change and neutral evolution: a case-study from Neolithic Europe. American Antiquity 66 (4): 577–593.Google Scholar
  139. Sheridan, A. (2005.) Les éléments d’origine bretonne autour de 4000 av. J.-C. En Ecosse: témoignages d’alliance, d’influence, de déplacement, ou quoi d’autre? In Marchand, G. and Tresset, A. (dir.) Unité et diversité des processus de néolithisation de la façade atlantique de l’Europe (6e–4e millénaires avant J.-C.). Table ronde de Nantes, 26–27 avril 2002. Mémoire XXXVI de la Société Préhistorique Française, Société Préhistorique Française, Paris, pp. 25–37.Google Scholar
  140. Sheridan, A. (2007). From Picardie to Pickering and Pencraig Hill? New information on ‘Carinated Bowl Neolithic’ in northern Britain. In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds.). Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 441–492.Google Scholar
  141. Sheridan, A. (2010). The neolithisation of Britain and Ireland: the big picture. In Finlayson, B. and Warren, G. (eds). Landscapes in transition, Oxbow, Oxford, pp. 89–105.Google Scholar
  142. Sherratt, A.G. (1995). Reviving the grand narrative: archaeology and long-term change. Journal of European Archaeology 3 (1): 1–32.Google Scholar
  143. Sidéra, I. (2008). Rubané, Villeneuve-Saint-Germain et Cardial. Filiation des industries osseuses. In Burnez-Lanotte, L., Ilett, M. and Allard, P. (eds) Fin des traditions danubiennes dans le Néolithique du Bassin parisien et de la Belgique (5100–4700 av. J.-C.). Autour des recherches de Claude Constantin, Société Préhistorique Française, Paris, pp. 209–219.Google Scholar
  144. Sillar, B. (1996). The Dead and the Drying: techniques for transforming people and things in the Andes, Journal of Material Culture 1 (3): 259–289.Google Scholar
  145. Thomas, J. (2003). Thoughts on the “repacked” Neolithic Revolution. Antiquity 77: 67–75.Google Scholar
  146. Thomas, J. (2007). Mesolithic-Neolithic transitions in Europe: from essence to inhabitation. In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 423–439.Google Scholar
  147. Thomas, J. (2008). The Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in Britain. In Pollard, J. (ed.) Prehistoric Britain, Blackwell, Oxford, pp. 58–89.Google Scholar
  148. Tresset, A. (1989). Tentative de caractérisation zooarchéologique d’une culture: le cas du Languedoc et de la Provence dans le Chasséen français. Anthropozoologica 10: 3–14.Google Scholar
  149. Tresset, A. (2002). De la mer au bétail en domaine atlantique: unité et diversité des processus d’apparition de l’élevage à la marge nord-ouest de l’Europe. Anthropozoologica 36: 13–35.Google Scholar
  150. Tresset, A. (2005). La place changeante des bovins dans les bestiaires du Mésolithique final et du Néolithique d’Armorique et des régions adjacentes. In Marchand, G. and Tresset, A. (dir.) Unité et diversité des processus de néolithisation de la façade atlantique de l’Europe (6e–4e millénaires avant J.-C.). Table ronde de Nantes, 26–27 avril 2002. Mémoire XXXVI de la Société Préhistorique Française, Société Préhistorique Française, Paris, pp. 273–286.Google Scholar
  151. Tresset, A. and Vigne, J.-D. (2007). Substitution of species, techniques and symbols at the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in western Europe. In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 189–210.Google Scholar
  152. van Andel, T. H. and Runnels, C. N. (1995). The earliest farmers in Europe. Antiquity 69 481–500.Google Scholar
  153. van Berg, P.-L. and Hauzeur, A. (2001). Le Néolithique ancien. Anthropologica et Praehistorica 112: 63–76.Google Scholar
  154. Vander Linden, M. (2006). Le phénomène campaniforme dans l’Europe du 3ème millénaire avant notre ère: synthèse et nouvelles perspectives. British Archaeological Reports International Series 1470, Archaeopress, Oxford.Google Scholar
  155. Vander Linden, M. (2011). In constant motion? Recent advances in mathematical modelling and radiocarbon chronology of the neolithisation of Europe. In Hadjikoumis, A., Robinson, E. and Viner, S. (eds) The dynamics of neolithisation in Europe: studies in honour of Andrew Sherratt. Oxbow, Oxford, pp. 41–61.Google Scholar
  156. Vanmontfort, B. (2001). The group of Spiere as a new stylistic entity in the Middle Neolithic Scheldt basin. Notae Praehistoricae 21: 139–143.Google Scholar
  157. Vanmontfort, B. (2007). Bridging the gap. The Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in a frontier zone. Documenta Praehistorica XXXIV: 105–118.Google Scholar
  158. Vanmontfort, B., Casseyas, C. and Veermeersch, P. (1997). Neolithic ceramics from Spiere “De Hel” and their contribution to the understanding of the earliest Michelsberg culture. Notae Praehistoricae 17: 123–134.Google Scholar
  159. Vanmontfort, B., Geerts, A.-I., Casseyas, C., Bakels, C.C., Buydens, C., Damblon, F., Langohr, R., Van Neer, W. and Vermeersch, P.M. (2004). De Hel in de tweede helft van het 5de millennium v. Chr. Een midden-Neolitische enclosure te Spiere (prov. West-Vlaanderen). Archeologie in Vlaanderen VIII: 9–77.Google Scholar
  160. Vaquer, J. (1998). Le midi méditerranéen de la France. In Guilaine, J. (dir.) Atlas du Néolithique européen II. L’Europe occidentale, E.R.A.U.L. 46, Liège, pp. 413–500.Google Scholar
  161. Verhart, L. (2007). New developments in the study of the Mesolithic of the Low Countries. In Bailey, G.N. and Spikins, P. (eds) Mesolithic Europe, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 158–81.Google Scholar
  162. Verron, G. (2000). Préhistoire de Normandie, Ouest-France, Rennes.Google Scholar
  163. Vigne, J.-D. and Buitenhuis, H. (1999). Les premiers pas de la domestication animale à l’Ouest de l’Euphrate: Chypre et l’Anatolie centrale. Paléorient 25 (2): 49–62.Google Scholar
  164. Warren, G. (2005). Autres temps, autres lieux: la fin du Mésolithique et le début du Néolithique dans l’Est de l’Ecosse. In Marchand, G. and Tresset, A. (dir.) Unité et diversité des processus de néolithisation de la façade atlantique de l’Europe (6e–4e millénaires avant J.-C.). Table ronde de Nantes, 26–27 avril 2002. Mémoire XXXVI de la Société Préhistorique Française, Société Préhistorique Française, Paris, pp. 13–23.Google Scholar
  165. Weiss, E., Kislev, M.E. and Hartmann, E. (2006). Autonomous cultivation before domestication. Science 312: 1608–1610.Google Scholar
  166. Weninger, B., Alram-Stern, E., Bauer, E., Clare, L., Danzeglocke, U., Jöris, C., Kubatzki, C., Rollefson, G., Todorova, H. and van Andel, T. (2006). Climate forcing due to the 8200 cal BP event observed at Early Neolithic sites in the eastern Mediterranean. Quaternary Research 66: 401–420.Google Scholar
  167. Wallaert-Pêtre, H. (2001). Learning how to make the right pots: apprenticeship strategies and material culture, a case-study in handmade pottery from Cameroon. Journal of Anthropological Research 57 (4): 471–493.Google Scholar
  168. Whittle, A. (2007). Going over: people and their times. In Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds.) Going over: the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in north-western Europe, British Academy, London, pp. 617–628.Google Scholar
  169. Whittle, A., Bartosiewicz, L., Boric´, D., Pettitt, P. and Richards, M.P. (2002). In the beginning: new radiocarbon dates for the Early Neolithic in northern Serbia and south-east Hungary. Antaeus 25: 63–118.Google Scholar
  170. Whittle, A., Bartosiewicz, L., Boric´, D., Pettitt, P. and Richards, M.P. (2005). New radiocarbon dates for the Early Neolithic in northern Serbia and south-east Hungary: omissions and corrections. Antaeus 28: 347–355.Google Scholar
  171. Whittle, A., Bayliss, A. and Healy, F. (2008). The timing and tempo of change: examples from the fourth millennium cal. BC in southern England. Cambridge Archaeological Journal 18 (1): 65–70.Google Scholar
  172. Whittle, A. and Cummings, V. (eds) (2007). Going over: The Mesolithic-Neolithic transition in North-West Europe, British Academy, London.Google Scholar
  173. Willcox, G. (2005). The distribution, natural habitats and availability of wild cereals in relation to their domestication in the Near East: multiple events, multiple centers. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany 14: 534–541.Google Scholar
  174. Zapata, L. and Peña-Chocarro, L. (2005). L’agriculture néolithique de la façade altantique européenne. In Marchand, G. and Tresset, A. (dir.) Unité et diversité des processus de néolithisation de la façade atlantique de l’Europe (6e-4e millénaires avant J.-C.). Table ronde de Nantes, 26–27 avril 2002. Mémoire XXXVI de la Société Préhistorique Française, Société Préhistorique Française, Paris, pp. 189–199.Google Scholar
  175. Zeder, M.A. (1999). Animal domestication in the Zagros: a review of past and current research. Paléorient 25 (2): 11–25.Google Scholar
  176. Zeder, M.A. (2008). Domestication and early agriculture in the Mediterranean basin: origins, ­diffusion, and impact. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 105: 11597–11604.Google Scholar
  177. Zeder, M.A. (2009). The Neolithic Macro-(R)Evolution: macro-evolutionary theory and the study of cultural change. Journal of Archaeological Research 17(1): 1–63.Google Scholar
  178. Zeder, M.A., Emswhiller, E., Smith, B.D. and Bradley, D.G. (2006). Documenting domestication: the intersection between genetics and archaeology. Trends in genetics 22 (3): 139–155.Google Scholar
  179. Zilhão. J. (2001). Radiocarbon evidence for maritime pioneer colonization at the origins of farming in west Mediterranean Europe. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 98: 14180–14185.Google Scholar
  180. Zohary, D. and Hopf, M. 2000. Domestication of plants in the Old World: the origin and spread of cultivated plants in West Asia, Europe and the Nile Valley. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Archaeology and Ancient HistoryUniversity of LeicesterLeicesterUK

Personalised recommendations