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Learning Objects, Content Management, and E-Learning

  • David Wiley
Chapter

Abstract

For better or worse, e-learning is still primarily a matter of delivering course materials via the world-wide web. With the increasing ubiquity of high-bandwidth connections to the home, even multimedia materials like videos and simulations are commonly delivered in-browser. This melding of education with the web brings a new variety of problems to educators who are already required to have a wide-ranging set of interdisciplinary skills.

Keywords

Learning Object Content Management Internal Context External Context Digital Storytelling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Instructional Psychology and TechnologyBrigham Young UniversityProvoUSA

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