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X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry in Twenty-First Century Archaeology

  • M. Steven Shackley
Chapter

Abstract

Edward Hall’s abstract for his 1960 paper entitled “X-ray fluorescent analysis applied to archaeology” in the journal Archaeometry is just as appropriate half a century later. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) is even more “well established” now, but is “not suitable for some projects” even though it might seem so, and archaeologists might think XRF is really appropriate. This volume is dedicated to issues in XRF analysis in geoarchaeology in particular. How does XRF work, and more importantly when and where is it appropriate? We have attempted to convey this without using physical science jargon, although it was difficult at many points. I have provided a glossary at the end of the volume to help in this direction.

Keywords

Neutron Activation Analysis Pacific Basin EDXRF Analysis Obsidian Sample Obsidian Source 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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