Self-Efficacy and Career Choice and Development

  • Gail Hackett
  • Nancy E. Betz
Part of the The Plenum Series in Social/Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

There are few other decisions that exert as profound an influence on people’s lives as the choice of a field of work, or career. Not only do most people spend considerably more time on the job than in any other single activity (save, arguably, sleep), but also choice of occupation significantly affects lifestyle, and work adjustment is intimately associated with mental health and even physical well-being (Levi, 1990; Osipow, 1986). Despite the relative neglect of work/career issues in the field of psychology at large, researchers in the area of vocational psychology have been studying career choice and work adjustment for decades, and a number of theoretical models of career choice and development have been generated (Hackett & Lent, 1992).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gail Hackett
    • 1
  • Nancy E. Betz
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Psychology in EducationArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyOhio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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