Self-Efficacy and Education and Instruction

  • Dale H. Schunk

Abstract

Current theoretical accounts of learning and instruction postulate that students are active seekers and processors of information (Pintrich, Cross, Kozma, & McKeachie, 1986; Shuell, 1986). Research indicates that students’ cognitions influence the instigation, direction, strength, and persistence of their achievement behaviors (Schunk, 1989b; Weinstein, 1989; Zimmerman, 1990).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dale H. Schunk
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Educational StudiesPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA

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