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The Voluntary Sector, Community Sector and Social Economy in Canada: Why one is not the Other

  • Deena White
Part of the Nonprofit and Civil Society Studies book series (NCSS)

Abstract

In the last decade of the twentieth century, the third sector was rehabilitated in a wide range of welfare states. Financed mainly by various levels of government throughout Europe and North America (Salamon et al, 1999), its role as a significant producer of welfare, though never absent, has grown in both importance and legitimacy. In conjunction with this trend, its increasing and potential weight as an economic actor has been strongly emphasized as well, particularly in the French language literature (Defourny & Monzon Campos, 1992; Laville, 1994; Eme et al, 1996; Lipietz & Leborgne, 1998; OECD, 1999; Campbell, 1999; Lévesque et al, 2001). Attention is increasingly focussed beyond the sector’s purely social contributions to encompass as well its contributions to the GNP and especially to labour force development. Indeed, as national concerns have taken a decidedly economistic turn compared to the thirty post-war years, the third sector has come to represent a terrain on which the distinction between social and economic policies are most blurred. Its increasing participation in employability development and job creation is seen to respond to social needs and to foster inclusion for the disadvantaged, vulnerable and excluded, as well as to play a significant role in employment / unemployment management and local economic development (OECD, 1998, 2001; Campbell, 1999; European Commission, 2001; Spear et al, 2001).

Keywords

Labour Market Social Economy Social Entrepreneurship Nonprofit Sector Labour Market Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

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  • Deena White

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